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lost by bad security, when the claim falls due, in not a trifle. 

Always try to find out which is likely to live longest, you or the company 
you insure in ; and therefore whether the company is insuring you or 
you are insuring the company, A thing you can't get after you have 
paid for it, isn't cheap at half a cent. 



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CLEARS ITS BOOKS OF JUST CLAIMS BY PAYING THEM IN FULL. 

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Assets, $12,664,000. - - Surplus, $2,4/2,000. 

PAID POLICY HOLDERS, £27,000,000— £2,151,000 i n ^94. 



JAMES C. BATTERSON, President. 



RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. 







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-- G. EJUSHNELL. 



IE&ATIVE DV BRAINERD. 



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P1ERSTINE & ELWOOD. 

GENERAL PRINTERS, 12 & 14 ELIZABETH ST. 

UTICA. N. Y. 



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\BOKRV 0$r TZt/ToKS." \S 






.MY-^V 







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THE HOMEWARD VIEW. 



To 

Oar Aoffyers 

we 

Dedicate 

"Tins I}®^. 



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Protocrcie. 



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HEX field and meadow, vale and glen with joyous clamor ring, 
That is the time when college men their yearly greeting bring. 
And thus the Hamiltonian goes wandering forth anew, 
Of all our love be it again a harbinger to you. 



It is a goodly harbinger and tells full many a tale 

How dear old College proudly looks o'er hill and teeming dale. 

In stories grave and full of full of fun, in prose and flowing rhyme, 

It will recall to each of you your golden college time. 

And therefore when from hallowed halls the wanderer comes once more, 
All you who were within their walls, oh ! open wide your door ; 
And may your heart with gladness fill when you are proudly told 
That alma muter on the Hill is thriving as of old. 



Editorial. 



rOR the last two years the Hamiltonian has been rapidly rising in the 
literary horizon and steadily becoming more conspicuous among its 
compeers. The production of last year seemed at the time of its ap- 
pearance to have reached the zenith of onr aspirations and the full-orbed 
radiance of perfection. But it is a well known fact in astronomy that there 
is no star so brilliant that its splendor may not be eclipsed by a vastly inferior 
body brought nearer to the observer's eye. In recognition of this fact we 
have striven to produce an animal that shall be 3 dangerous companion to 
the one issued last year. 

It has therefore been our purpose to publish an annual that shall be 
simple and natural in arrangement and complete and impartial in the state- 
ment of fact — one that shall leave nothing to be desired either in the number 
and quality of illustrations or in the style and beauty of its binding and 
printing. Our object is to present an accurate picture of college life during 
the last year. "With malice towards none," the editors have tried to ''hit 
off" college matters, to bring to light the humorous happenings of the year, 
and to poke good-natured fun at the failings and eccentricities of the faculty 
and the students. 

It is not for us to say whether our purpose has been accomplished. We 
have labored long and diligently. We have done our utmost and have no 
apologies to make; nothing even to take back. Our only ".egret is — like 
Nathan Hale's — that we each have but one life to lose. 

The editors now leave you to your perusal and criticism while they hasten 
to make a farewell visit to their friends at a di-tance, where they have been 
compelled to spend so much of their time of late. They feel the approach 
of another attack of those dreadful maladies that have been so insatiably 
rampant upon our hillside during the last few weeks, and seek recuperation 
for their shattered nerves under the placid influences of the country, where 
they may also find time to mourn the dreadful mortality among friends 
and relations, since their work began. 

Congratulations as well as donations to the Hamiltonian Editors' Relief 
Fund should be sent to the Dean of the Faculty, by whom they will be 
promptly forwarded to the grateful and deserving sufferers. 



Prof. William R. Terrett, D. D. 

— ©— 

HE nervous energy of Professor William Rogers Terrett is a matter 

of course, for he was born in the City of New York. The date was 

July 19th, 1840. His father, the Reverend John C. Terrett, was an 

^ alumnus of Williams in the class of 1833. The late Doctor Root 

y ' was of the Hamilton class of '33, and so two sons of '33 do us ser- 

vice to-day. 

William R. Terrett sought his father's alma mater for his college 
work and graduated at Williams in 1871. He at once entered Princeton 
Theological Seminary, whence he graduated in the class of 1874. Dr. 
Terrett thus brought to our College on the hills of Central New York, 
the quick vigor of city life, the quiet culture from among the Berkshire 
Hills, the aggressive puritan ism which McCosh breathed into Princeton. 

Ordained immediately after his graduation — June, 1874 — he took 
charge of a church at Amenia, Dutchess County, New York. Thence he 
was called to Dalton, Berkshire County, Mass., and thence again to the 
Second Presbyterian Church of Saratoga Springs. Dr. Terrett was a 
popular as well as an able pastor and preacher. At Saratoga especially, 
brought in contact with the ablest men of all donominations, he easily 



ic If 1 his own. 



But be was a student : he was attracted especially by the study of 
American History and Constitutional Law. The strain of pastoral and 
pulpit work was heavy ; and in 1889, to the lasting regret of his Saratoga 
parish, he accepted the Maynard-Knox Professorship in Hamilton. The 
ground covered by this chair included Dr. Terrett's favorite studies — but 
more. It was soon clear that with the demands of modern education in 
Law, History and Political Economy, no one man could cover the ground 



satisfactorily. Dr. Terrett is not a man to tolerate shams or do shams, or 
even cursory work. When he dives he proposes to touch bottom. He 
demands this same bottom-touching of his students. 

As he could not cover the ground to his satisfaction, he, in 1893, 
resigned the Maynard-Knox Chair. The Board of Trust, realizing his 
great ability and his value as an instructor, at once made him Professor 
of Constitutional Law and American History. This Chair he now fills. 
Receiving the degree of A. M. in course from Williams in 1874, he was 
made an Honorary Alumnus of Hamilton by the degree of D. D. con- 
ferred in 1887. 

Dr. Terrett rarely preaches in the College Chapel, which the students 
much regret. He is, however, occupied nearly every Sunday and is in 
demand for addresses and lectures. With his theologic and legal lore 
there is a store of anecdote, and below his scholarly seriousness flows a 
strong, full vein of humor, and he is doubtless by far the best after-din- 
ner speaker of the Faculty. This is saying not a little ; for the Hamil- 
ton Faculty has some good talkers among its pundits. 

Dr. Terrett pushes his work — sometimes the boys think too hard ; 
but he is popular, is wide awake on athletics, and the boys, proud of his 
scholarship, his eloquence and his work, are ready to give him the col- 
lege yell — every time. 



Calendar for 1595. 



— ©— 

Jan. 3. Winter Term opens Thursday. 

Jan. 4. Head. Pruyn and Kirkland Orations Presented Friday noon. 

Jan. 5. Examination of Delinquents, Saturday. 

Jan. 31. Day of Prayer for Colleges, Thursday. 

Feb. 22. Washington's Birthday, Friday. 

March 21. Underwood Prize Examination, Thursday. 

March 21. Curran and Hawley Prize Examination, Thursday. 

March 22. Term Examinations begin Friday. 

March 27. Winter Term Closes Wednesday. 

Vacation of tvo U)ee^. 

April 11. Spring Term opens, Thursday. 

April 12. Clark Prize Orations, Prize Theses, and Prize Essays presented, Friday noon. 

April 13. Examination of Delinquents, Saturday. 

May 9. Graduating Orations presented, Thursday noon. 

May 16. Field Day, Thursday. 

May 30. Decoration Day, Thursday. 

June 1. Prize Examination in Metaphysics, Saturday. 

June 3. Senior Examinations begin,. . , Monday. 

June 5. Clark Prize Exhibition, Wednesday Evn'g. 

June 7. Graduating Honors announced, Friday. 

June 18. Munson Prize Examination in German, Tuesday. 

June 19. Southworth Prize Examination in Physics, Wednesday. 

June 19. Term Examinations begin, Wednesday. 

June 20. Munson Prize Examination in French, Thursday. 

June 22. Prizes announced, Saturday. 

June 23. Baccalaureate Sermon, Sunday Morning. 

June 23. Address before the Y. M. C. A., Sunday Evening. 

June 24. Prize Declamation, Monday Evening. 

June 25. Entrance Examinations, Tuesday. 

June 25. Prize Debate, Tuesday Evening. 

June 26. Alumni Day, Wednesday. 

June 27. Commencement, Thursday. 

Vacation of TVelve Wee^s- 

Sept. 17-18. Entrance Examinations, Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Sept. 18. All new students meet the Dean and the Registrar in the Chapel at 

l::;o in the afternoon, Wednesday. 

3ept. 19. Autumn Term opens, Thursday. 

Sept. 21. Examination of Delinquents, Saturday. 

Sept. 21. Brockway Prize Examination, Saturday. 



10 






Trostees. 



— © — 

Elected. 
CHARLES C. KINGSLEY, A. M., Utica, Chairman, 1867 

Rev. L. MERRILL MILLER, D. D., Ogdensburg, 1869 

PUBLIUS V. ROGERS, A. M., Utica, 1869 

GILBERT MOLLISON, Esq., Oswego, 1871 

Hon. ELLIS H. ROBERTS, LL. D., New Yerk, 1872 

Hon. GEORGE M. DIVEN, A. M.. Elmira 1874 

Hon. JOSEPH R. HAWLEY, LL. D., Hartford, Conn., 1875 

Pres. DAVID H. COCHRAN, Ph. D., LL. D., Brooklyn, 1875 

Rev. JAMES B. LEE, D. D., Franklinville 1877 

Prof. EDWARD NORTH, L. H. D., LL. D., Clinton, 1881 

Hon. ELIHU ROOT, LL. D., New York, 1883 

Hon. CHARLES A. HAWLEY, LL. D., Seneca Falls 1884 

Rev. THOMAS B. HUDSON, D. D., Clinton, # 1884 

HORACE B. SILLIMAN, LL. I)., Cohoes 1885 

A. NORTON BROCKWAY, A. M., M. D., New York, 1885 

Rev. T. RALSTON SMITH, D. D., Buffalo, 1886 

Rev. GEORGE B. SPALDING, D. D., LL. D., Syracuse, 1886 

Hon. THEODORE M. POMEROY, LL. D., Auburn, 1886 

TALCOTT H. CAMP, Esq., Watertown, 1890 

CHARLES L. STONE, A. M., Syracuse, 1890 

THOMAS D. CATLIN, A. M., Ottawa, 111., 1890 

GEORGE E. DUNHAM, A. M., Utica, 1891 

HAMILTON B. TOMPKINS, A. M., New York, 1892 

WILLIAM M. WHITE. A. M., Utica, 1892 

Pres. M. WOOLSEY STRYKER, D. D., LL. D., Clinton, 1892 

CHARLES H. SMYTH, Esq., Clinton, 1893 

DAN P. EELLS, A. M., Cleveland, Ohio, 1893 

Hon. WILLIAM H. H. MILLER, LL. D., Indianapolis, Ind., 1893 

Rev. THOMAS B. HUDSON, D. D., Clinton, 
Secretary (1885), and Treasurer (1886). 

Executive Committee. 
Messrs, STRYKER, ROGERS, KINGSLEY, SILLIMAN, HUDSON, NORTH, STONE, SMYTH, 

U 



The P'aCQtt^. 



Melancthon Woolsey Stryker, (A. B. 1872,) D. I)., LL. I)., President, 

Walcott Professor (1892) of Natural Religion, of Christian 
Evidences and Etliics, and Pastor of Die College Church. 

Edward North, (A. B. 1841,) L. H. D., LL. D. 

Edward North Professor ( 1843 ) of the Greek Language and, 
Literature. 

Rev. Oren Root, (A. B. 1856,) D. D. 

{Tutor 1860-62). Pratt Professor {1880) of Mathematics, 
and Registrar of the Faculty. 

Rev. Abel Grosvenor Hopkins, (A. B. 1866,) Ph. D. 

Benjamin- Bates Professor {186.9) of the Latin Language and 
Literature, and Dean of t}ie Faculty. 

Herman Carl George Brandt, (A. B. 1872,) Pn. D. 

( L istn a-lor, 1874-76 ). Muu soi i Professor { 1882 ) of th e Ger- 
man and French Languages and Literatures, and of 
Philology. 

Rev. William Rogers Terrett, (A. B. 1871,) D. I). 

Professor (1889) of American History and Institutions, and 
of Constitutional Law. 

Albeo David Morrill, (B. S. 1876,) A. M., M. S. 

Child s Professor ( 1891 ) of Agricultural Chemistry, and Pro- 
fessor of General Chemistry and of Biology. 

Clinton Scollard, (A. B. 1881,) A. M. 

Professor (1891) of English Literature and, of Anglo-Saxon. 

Charles Henry Smyth, Jr., (Ph. B. 1888,) Ph D. 

Stone Professor (1891) of Geology and, Mineralogy. 

V2 



Rev. William Harder Squires, (A. B. 1888,) A. M. 

Professor (1891) of Psychology, Logic, and Pedagogics, and 
Instructor in Hebrew. 

Samuel J. Saunders, (A. B. 1888,) I). Sc. 

Professor (1892) of Phydcs, and Instructor in Astronomy 
upon the Litchfield Foundation. 

Brainard Gardner Smith, (A. B. 1872,) A. M. 

Up.son Professor ( 1893) <>f Rhetoric >ni<l Oratory. 



Litchfield Professor of Astronomy, and Director of the Litch- 
field Observatory. 

Edward Fitch, (A. B. 1886,) A. M. 

Assistant Professor ( 1889 ) of Greek and of German. 

Melvin Gilbert Dodge, (A. B. 1890,) A. M. 

Librarian (1892), Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and 
Clerk of the Faculty. 

Delos De Wolf Smyth, (A. B. 1890,) A. M. 

Associate Professor (1892) of Municipal Law, Modern His- 
tory, and. Political and. Social Science, upon the Maynard- 
Knox Foundation. 

Walter Thomas Couper, (A. B. 1892,) A. M. 

Acting AssisUint Professor (1893) of Greek and of German. 

*John William O'Brien, (A. B. 1873,) LL. B. 

Lecturer and Instructor (1894) in Municipal Lav. 



*Died May 5th, 1895. 



L3 




i* ? 



Mi^tor^ of tf)e 5enior Cla^S- 

-Q- 

"This slippery globe of life whirls of itselt, 
Hast'ning our youth away into the dark." 

—James Eussell Lain//. 

HE college days of the class of 1895 will soon be but a memory — a 
memory filled with brightness, friendship, pleasure ; a memory that, 
like a cool moss-grown bucket, will give delight at every draught in 
years to come. 

It was in the Fall of 1892, classmates, that we, for the first time, gath- 
ered before the chapel, drank limey water from the college well, reclined be- 
neath the poplars, the poplars that 

"Knew us, child and youth and man, 
Wonderful fellows to dream and plan, 
With a great thing always to come— who knows? " 

How dear these old scenes have become; how clear the friends assjciated 
with them as time flies on apace ! We were fifty strong then; now we are 
but thirty. Two have passed away. Others have left us for some other 
work. 

The events of Freshmen year brought '95 into great prominence. The 
adventure of Hallow' een, the revenge of the town folk, the rape of the hat, 
the chicken and rhe bee, the long night watches beneath the hosptitable roof 
of one of our c'assmates, the final triumph in the poster rows, the class sup- 
per,— this is a record of events such as may well bring delight to every son 
of '95. 

Sophomore year was a year of work. We began the struggle with the 
tongue of the Teuton and the Gaul ; tried to fathom the. mysteries of never- 
ending curves; reasoned with Dem sthenes and dreamed with Theocritus. 
But we found time, nevertheless, to row, to sing, to initiate the custom of 
Sophomore hop: and 

"To lend ourselves to mirth and merriment 
That bars a thousand harms and lengthens life." 

During Sophomore year occurred the inauguration of Dr. Stryker as 
President of HaimTon College. 

Junior year passed speedily and pleasantly. As upper classmen we 
loyally endeavored to uphold, in the face ot obstacles, the traditions of Ham- 
ilton College. Junior promenade and fraternity hops made college life pleas- 
ant. The whist club and "stag" affairs brought the members of the class 
together and strengthened bonds of friendship. 

At last Senior year, with its duties and privileges, has arrived. Time 
passes busily^ancl quickly. '95 establishes the custom of the cap and gown. 

The history of '95 is not yet complete. Were the historian a prophet he 
might tell of the Commencement, the sad farewells, the last days of a class, 
each one of which may say 

"We have fought a good fight." 
15 



sSentor Ocr^S 



Class Aotto: 

" HXtov dierog %r t xel. 

Class Colors : 

Lavender and white. 

(Mass *Ielt : 

Boom Rait ! Boom Rah ! Who are We? 
Vive La ! Vive La ! XCV ! 

Cha$$ OFFICERS: 

ELY BUELLj President. 

H. ROSWELL BATES, Vice President. 

WILLIAM A. AIKEN, Secretary. 

— , Treasurer. 



Ti)e Class. 



William Andrew Aiken, J. /»'. £., 0. N. E. Auburn, J. A. E. House. 

Secretary of Class. Historian Freshman Class Banquet. 'Varsity Base Ball Team 
'93. 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '94. Senior Director of Foot Ball. Editor Ham- 
iltonian. First Junior Prize Essay. Hawley Classical Medal. Kirkland Prize 
Oration. President '95 Whist Club. Chairman Senior Ball Committee. 

Burton Marcus Balch, A. Y. Utica, A.Y. House. 

Poet Class Supper. Freshman Prize Essay. Sophomore Octette. Treasurer Y. 
M. C. A. Business Manager Hamilton Literary Monthly. First Munson Prize in 
French. Poet Class Day. 

Herbert Roswell Bates, 'I 1 '. Y. Auburn, W. V. House. 

Class Vice President. First Freshman Prize Essay. Second Sophomore Prize 
Essay. Freshman Banquet Committee. Dramatic Club '94. Hamiltonian Ed- 
itor. Prophet Class Day. Clark Prize Orator. 



Ely Buell, S. <P. Rochester, 



Class President. 

Herbert Ray Burgess,. X. W. . . . 
Editor Hamiltonian. 

Thomas Gregory Burt, E. L. 8. . 



Aubi 



. . 24 S. H. 
X. '/'*. House. 



1 H. H. 



. . Pompey, 

First Sophomore Prize Speaker. 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '93 and '94. College 
Monitor. 



James Walton Carmalt, 



(P. 



Clinton, 



. . College St. 



Chairman Class Supper Committee. Sophomore Hop Committee. Second Prize 
Declamation Junior. Inter-Collegiate Director of Athletics. Manager Dramatic 
Club '95. Pruyn Medal Oration. Senior Ball Committee. Clark Prize Orator. 

William Wallace Chambers, A.A.<P.,0.N.E. Utica, 9 8. H. 

Sophomore Octette. Editor Hamiltonian. Junior Prize Speaker. Chairman 
Presentation Committee. Secretary Athletic Union. 



17 



George Clark, Jr., E. L. S Ensenore, 31 S. H. 

Second Curran Medal. Munson German Scholarship. Presentation Committee 
Commencement. 

Frederick Joseph De La Fleur, E. L. S. Adams, Chapel. 

Executive Committee Commencement. 

Roy Bicknell Dudley, E. L. S Augusta, 5 H. H. 

'Varsity Foot Ball Team, '92, '93 and '94. Second Prize in Chemistry. 
John Groves Everett, .V. W. Chiton, Williams St. 

Second Freshman Prize Speaker. Editor Hamilton Literary Monthly. Manager 
Base Ball '95. Executive Committee Commencement. Clark Prize Orator. 

Orlando Eaton Ferry, X. F. Clinton, Fountain St. 

First Freshman Prize Speaker. President Class Day. 

James Henry Foster, 0. J. X., 0. V. E. . Verona, ... . 0. A. X. House. 
First Brockway Entrance Prize. Class Senator. First Sophomore Essay Prize. 
Truax Greek Scholarship. First Junior Essay Prize. First Curran Classical 
Medal. First Tompkins Mathematical Prize. Business Manager Hamilton Liter- 
ary Monthly Fall of '94. 

Joseph Irwin France, 0. J. .V.. 0. X. L. . Johnstown, . . . 0. J. X. House. 

Freshman and Sophomore Foot Ball Director. 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '91 and 

'92. 'Varsity Athletic Team '92. Second Broad Jump Inter-Collegiate Field 

Day 1892. Editor Hamiltonian. Junior Prize Speaker. Historian Class Day. 

George Herbert Geer, '/''. T. : 0. X. E. . . Seneca Falls, .... l F. T. House. 

S< ■< ond Sophomore Prize Speaker. 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '92 and '93. 'Varsity 
Base Ball Team '92, '93 and '95. Captain Freshman Base Ball Team. Captain 
'Varsity Base Ball Team '95. College Choir '92, '93, '94 and '95. Sophomore 
Octette. Banjo Club '94 and '95. Manager Banjo Club '95. Chairman Junior 
Prom. Committee. Poet Campus Day. 

Isaac John Green wood, Jr., A. A. <P., 0.N.E. New York, . . . . A, A. (P. Hall. 
'Varsity Foot Ball Team '92, '93 and '94. Literary Editor Hamilton Literary 
Monthly. Manager Glee and Banjo Club. Manager Sophomore Glee Club. 
Senior Ball Committee. 

John Harvey Lee, 0. J. X.,0. X. E. . . FranMinville, . . 0. J. .V. House. 

Hawley Classical Medal. First Junior Declamation Prize. President Athletic 
Association 1894-5. Editor Hamilton Literary Monthly. Clark Prize Orator. Ex- 
ecutive Committee Commencement. 

IS 



Millabd Claude Loomis, E. L. S. . . . Oxford, 8 IT. EL 

Prize Speaker Sophomore Year. Hawley Classical Medal. Orator Class Day. 
Jay Herbert Mac Connell, J. )'. . . . Crawford, N. J., . . A. Y. House. 
Athletic Team '92, '93, '94. College Organist. Sophomore Octette. Leader Glee 
Club. Invitation Committee Commencement. 

Friend Hull Miller, A. Y Deansville. Deansville. 

Tompkins Mathematical Medal. Second Munson Prize in French. President 
Campus Day. 

Horace Thornburgh Owen, -. </>. . . . Clinton, Williams St. 

Sophomore Octette. College Quartette '94 and. '95. College Glee Club. Perma- 
nent Class Secretary. 
Samuel Gilmore Palmer, J. K. E.,0. N. E.Penn Van, ... J. A. E. House. 
Class Athletic Team. College Athletic Team. Sophomore Octette. Class Photog- 
rapher. Clark Prize Orator. 

Anthony Nicholas Petersen, A. J. (P.,0. tV. E. Utica, 8 S. H. 

Base Ball Team '92, '93, '95. Athletic Team '9.°,. Vice President Y . M. C. A. 
President Tennis Association. 

William Emmett Pettit, E. L. S Wilson, 31 S. H. 

Hawley Classical Medal. Invitation Committee. 

John Barton Seymour, 1\ </> 'New Berne, N. C, . 32 H. H. 

Second Brock way Entrance Prize. Second Essay Prize Sophomore. Editor Ham- 
iltonian. Head Prize Oration. Junior Director of Athletics '94. Invitation 
Committee. 

George Irwin Stone, A. Y. Mexico, . . . Silliman Hall. 

Sophomore Prize Speaker. Essay Prize Sophomore. Editor Hamiltonian. Second 
Tompkins Mathematical Prize. Huntington Mathematical Scholarship. Presi- 
dent Y. M. C. A. Foot Ball Manager '94. Presentation Committee. 

James Edward Sullivan, Oneida, 6 S. H. 

Right Tackle Syracuse University Foot Ball Team '93. Substitute Hamilton Foot 
Ball Team '94. 

Benjamin Hurd Thorp, W. V. Gilbertsville, . . '/'. )'. House. 

'Varsity Foot Ball Team '94. Class Director of Athletics. Class Elder College 
Church. Sophomore Response. College Monitor. First Mile Run Inter-Colle- 
giate '93. Senior Executive Committee. 

Clarence Stewart Wright, A. J. </>., 9. N. E. Olego, 25 S. H. 

Freshman Prize Speaker. President Freshman Banquet. ' Varsity Foot Ball Team 
'92, '93 and '94. Captain 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '94. College Quartette '92, 
'93 and '94. College Glee Club '95. 

19 



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*Jantor History. 



9 C\\ f^ ^ slowly climbing up and over the third round in the ladder 

Qj\j of College life, and the time lias come for it to send out to 
an anxiously expectant public, its Hamiltonian. 

Naturally, tins public will want to know about the class which has 
put forth such an interesting book, and to satisfy this demand a Histori- 
an is selected. Whether the supply will equal the demand, remains to 
be seen. 

Elsewhere in this volume the especial feats of '90 will be crowed 
over, so that in this brief space the Historian will devote himself to 
' ' glittering generalities. ' ' 

Ever since '96 placed its baby feet on the Chapel steps that rainy 
morning in September, it has been recognized as a class of workers. 

Not all of us are like the busy bee, by any means ; but taking a 
birds-eye view of the class, we think '96 merits the name. Why, even 
Ward and Bacon have been known to ask where the lesson is. 

This tendency has been felt not only in scholarship, but in every 
department of College life. Whatever '96 has deemed worthy of accom- 
plishment has been done, and done well, to the terror and discomfiture of 
opponents on athletic field and campus. 

How could we be other than workers, with such an example as our 
predecessors have set us. One thing alone (alas, that it must be chron- 
icled,) is lacking to complete success ; never have we been able to attain 
the remarkable speed of '95 in working our mouths. 

Our course thus far has been smooth and uneventful ; not beset with 
mountainous mole hills, nor decorated with the gilded brass of some of 
our contemporaries. But we can say of a verity, " We have lived a true 



College life," and have blended its lights and shadows into a picture 
which will he pleasant in the future to look back upon. 

We have waded thro' the snows of a Clinton winter, and have toiled 
up to recitations in hottest June, without complaint. Some of us have 
never cut a recitation, and tell it with pride ; while others of us have 
broken records in the matter of warnings, and point to them with pride. 

We have, as Freshmen, longed for hours together ; as Sophomores, 
we have yelled and burned posters together. We have played whist and 
told stories to each other by the dying fire, as Juniors ; and thro' it all 
we have come to think a great deal of each other. 

We are a sober and quiet class. There have been occasions when 
we didn't want the Faculty around, but they are few, and we are home 
all right now (thanks to our friends). 

We are approaching the period when we shall look back on our 
College life. Looking backward is sometimes unpleasant, (for some 
classes,) hut when, after we have smoked the calumet together and sepa- 
rated, no longer a class, it will be with tender recollections and longings 
that we look back on the dear old days of '96. 



Junior Class. 



Cl^SS Aotfo: 



Eizoudaioi rrj aXydsir. 



Class Colors : 

Red and White. 



Class ^Iell: 

Braxy-Koax-Koax-Koax ! 
Braxy-Koax-Koax-Koax ! 
Who-up-Wiio-up ! 

HlTLLABALIX ! NlNETY-SlX ! 



CIyA35 OFFICERS : 

CARL A. BABTIST, President. 

WILLIAM E. HEWITT, Vice President. 

LOUIS K. R. LAIRD, Secretary. 

HARRY B. WARD, Treasurer. 



2:-! 



janioi\5- 

-^ttc CLAaa or is 96.^- 

Glassical Course, 

Alexander Alison. Jr., Seattle, Washington,. . . . A. K. E. House. 

f Joseph B. Astwood, Angus, Minn., Mr. De Regt's. 

f Horace Greely Atwater, Norfolk, A. K. E. House. 

Edward Silas Babcock, Camden, Chapel. 

Carl Augustus Babtist, Fredonia, 24 H. H. 

Hiram David Bacon, Pultney, 9 H. H. 

George Alden Bates, Rochester, A. T. House. 

Hoffman T. Baumgarten, Hornellsville, Silliman Hall. 

flsAAc Lindslay Best, Ceylon, A. T. House. 

fHoRACE Howard Bogue, Avon, 23 S. H. 

tFr ank T. Budd, New York City, .... 

Thomas Upson Ciiesebrough, Syracuse, 32 H. FI. 

Zelotus Wesley Commerford, Boonville, 6 S. H. 

Henry Jared Cookinham, Jr., Utica, 28 H. FF 

Birr Gould Eells, Walton, 8 H. II. 

tGEORGE Wheeler Elkins, Mexico, A. K. E. House. 

t Walter Hubert Emery, Mexico, 6 S. H. 

John Arden Furguson, Canandaigua, X. W. House. 

Charles Archibald Green, Denver, Colo., Factory St. 

William Eugene Hewitt, Syracuse, . . 2. #. Hall. 

Frank Wing Holmes, Dugway, 28 S. H. 

John S. Hoyt, Chicago, College St. 

Frank Pattengill Knowlton, Holland Patent, d. T. House. 

Oscar A [.cert Knox, Los Angeles, Cal., S. A. X. House. 

George Lewis Leech, Geneva, A. $. Hall. 

Edward McNally, Franklin, A. K. E. House. 

24 



William Tiiroop Moore, Saratoga, A. T. House. 

f Arthur Leonard Parsons, Mt. Morris, College St. 

Charles Willard Rice, Halls Corners, X. W. House. 

Edwin Bishop Bobbins, Knoxboro, Utica St. 

Arthur Dwight Scovel, Clinton, College St. 

Setii New-land Thomas, Moravia, 6 S. H. 

Neile Fassett Towner, Washington, T). C, X.W. House. 

Frank Elias Van Wie, Howard, . . . 18 H. H. 

Harry Barnes Ward, Buffalo, A. T. House. 

Frederic Parkman Warfield, Canandaigua, 16 H. H. 

Arthur Ten Eyck Warner, Richmondville, A. K. E. House. 

SLatin Scientific Course, 

Louis Krum Richards Laird, Auburn, W.T. House. 

Byron Brown Taggart, Watertown, . W.T. House. 

fSENECA Curtis Taylor, St. Louis, W.T. House. 

fHuBERT Harris Wright, Cambridge, Md. , W.T. House. 

Gardner Weeks Wood, Maine, A. K.E. House. 



f At one time member of the class. 



25 




^J.ct 



v>opf)omore Ilt^tor^. 



QNTIL the photograph shall reveal color as well as form, many of 
the events in the history of '97 must be familiar only to the 
chosen few. No pen can portray the scenes through which we 
have passed in the two brief years of our college life. 

It is sometimes hard for us to realize that we once were wearers of 
the green. How sudden has been the transition ! From the pugilistic 
disputes of our youthful days, from the forbidding darkness and gruesome 
scenes of the "old Gym", and from beneath the cooling waters of the 
college well, we have come to the pinnacle of greatness, from which we 
now look back over fields, gory, it is true, but decked with the banners 
of victory, and forward to realms unexplored. But the future has no 
terrors for '97. 

Faithfully have our duties been performed. Every college tradition 
has been honored. The blue banner has been nailed to the chapel spire, 
only to be lowered by the vigilant guardian of the peace before rosy 
morning could proclaim our prowess to the world. Town and Seminary 
have been soothed by our evening song and wakened by our cheer. The 
pockets of the selectmen have been swelled by our solicited contributions. 
Several of our number — martyrs to higher education — have sung paeans 
in the village jail. By evoking from the editor of the local sheet col- 
umns of vituperation and attack, we have shown ourselves worthy of the 
respect of all gentlemen and high minded citizens. 

27 



With an honorable record of achievment in the early years of her 
college life, '07 is ready to assume the duties and responsibilities of up- 
per-classmanship. 

It is not without a feeling of regret that we release our hold on the 
pleasures of under-classman years. We feel that Sophomore dignity will 
ill become the motley aggregation which is coming after us ; but we trust 
they have profited by our instructions. 

Numbers may decrease, the powers that be may cut down our ranks; 
still '97 shall ever grow stronger, and our love for Hamilton shall deepen 
as the years pass. 




28 



C3opf)omore Cla^. 



•o^o'-' 2 EZ/^> 



Class Aotf o : 

Adpt$ Xa.piv Tixrst. 



Ctass Color : 

Blue. 



(Mass Vita: 

Wax-i-co ! Wax-i-co ! Rip-Rah-Reven ! 
Ham-il-ton ! Ham-il-ton ! Ninety-Seven ! 



CL,A5£ OFFICER^: 

FOREST ROSE, President. 

ALLAN P. AMES, Vice President. 

CLARENCE A. FETTERLY, Secretary. 

DARWIN W. CONGDON, Treasurer. 



29 



C3opf)omores. 

-^•the CLAaa of is^^- 

Classical Course, 

Allan Pepperell Ames, Albany, 31 H. H. 

George Anderson, Fort Davis, Texas, 24 S. H. 

Crosby Jordan Beakes, Middletown J. K. E. House. 

Hulbert TenEyck Beardsley New York, 28 S. H. 

Albert Wilhelm Boesche. Watertown, A. T. House. 

Horace Howard Bogue, Avon, 23 S. H. 

Darwin Wilcox Congdon, Randolph, 12 H. H. 

Norman Addison Darling, Salisbury, 10 H. H. 

David Adelbert Davy, St. Johnsville, A. K. E. House. 

Alfred Roy Ehman, Cuba, W, T. House. 

Clarence Aubrey Fetterly, Utica, 2 Elm St. 

Cuthbert Charles Frost, Syracuse, Chapel. 

David Guilim George, Rome, S. A. X. House. 

James Madison Glass, Rochester, A. K.E. House. 

John Milton Holley, Je. , La Crosse, Wis., 29 S. H. 

Winthrop Haight Hopkins, Palmyra, 21 S. II. 

Benjamin Robert Johnson, Albany, 31 H. H. 

Charles Albert Joiinscn, Franklin vi lie, 10 H. H. 

Silas Conrad Kimm, Clinton, Dwight Ave. 

Robert Gardner McGregor, Utica, 29 S. H. 

Darwin Frank Pickard, Syracuse, W. V. House. 

Joshua Edwin Sweet, Unadilla, A. K. E. House. 

James Bruce Turnbull, Andes, A. T. House. 

Henry White, Holland Patent, A. T. House. 

30 



Irving Dewey Williams, . 
James Albert Wtnans, . . 



Turin, A. A. $, Hall, 

Sidney Centre, A. K.E. House. 



Xatin^Scientific Course. 



Bertrand Whitcomb Babcock, . . 
Theodore Medad Pomeroy, Jr., . 

Forest Rose, 

Percy Allen Rose, 



Oil City, Pa., A. K. E. Mouse. 

Auburn, L6 S. II. 

Johnstown, Pa., 14 S. H. 

Johnstown, Pa., 14 S. II. 



Henry Kitchell Webster, Evanston, 11 











%) 



Freeman History. 



TT HAVE been ask-ed as a mem-ber of the great and glo-rions class of nine-ty-eight to 
I write a class his-tory and will try and do so. 

I We have been here quite a long time now and are at last be-gin-ning to take our 

pro-per place. We are all o-ver be-ing home-sick, and would like the school very 
much if those bad Soph-o-mores would not treat us so mean. They call us fresh and sli- 
my and make up all sorts of hor-rid songs and class cries a-bout us, and worst of all, they 
row with us and throw us down in the mud and get our new clothes all dirty. 

We bought some fine lovely canes and were go-ing to car-ry them; but they just went 
and took them with-out say-ing a word to any-body a-bout it, and sent them way down 
in Penn-syl-van-ia where we could not get them. But we were ve-ry sharp in try-ing to get 
them back and were e-ven shrewd and sly e-nough to get Mr. Space (he is the express- 
man) to let us have the trunk of one of the Soph-o-mores in which we thought the canes 
were. But just as we found that they were not in the trunk and that the canes were 
about a foot lon-ger than the trunk, the man who own-ed it came in and made us feel 
awful by mak-ing all man-ner of fun of us, and be-sides Mr. Space swore at us aw-fully 
and made us pay for car-ry-ing the trunk. 

We would have had an aw-ful good joke on them in get-ting our pos-ters out first if 
they.had not gone out the same night, the hateful things, and pasted their pos-ters, which 
said aw-ful mean things, right over ours so no bo-dy could see them. 

The Jun-iors and Sen-iors are not quite so mean to us; but they seem to for-get that 
we were sen-iors our-selves in our schools, and ought to be re-spec-ted. They say we are 
fresh and green (some-how or o-ther I don't like those two words) and they laugh-ed at 
us when we talk-ed of form-ing a tid-dle-de winks club. 

My sis-ter has been to board-ing school and she told me that the Sen-iors would give 
spreads in our hon-our, but as yet they have not done so. 

But we don't care one bit and try to re-turn good for e-vil by car-ry-ing their laun- 
dry and things when they ask us to. 



Next year we arc' going to form a so-cie-ty for the pre-ven-tation of cru-el-ty to Fresh- 
men; tV.r we would do as we would be done by; and we know it would please the Fresh- 
men ve-ry much. After this Soph-o-mores must be good to the Fresh-men just like they 
are in the school where my sis-ter was. 

We have had a class meet-ing and have taken as our mot-to, "Ear-ly to bed and ear- 
ly to rise, makes us weal-thy, heal-thy and wise." We al-so a-dopt-ed some res-o-lut-i-ons 
which it might be well to put right in here. 

" We, the class of nin-ty-eight, here-by re-solve; that, as row-ing is bru-tal and degrad- 
ing we will not row the Fresh-men next year, as it will make them coarse and rough; also 
that we will not scurf, as it is vul-gar and disagreeable (repulsive) and be-sides we would 
not want to use any words that our mam-mas would not like; also that the first class 
no lon-ger be call-eel fresh-men, as fresh is not nice, but that they be called Pre-par-a-to- 
ry School Post-grad-u-ates; also that as the Soph-o-mores have been so mean to us we 
will not in-vite them to our class ban-quet; also that we thank the up-per class-men for 
taking such good care of us last fall when the Soph-o-mores would have ta-ken us; al-so 
that a copy of these res-o-lut-ions be sent to Mr. Stry-ker to read to the teach-ers' meet- 
ing, to show them that we did not take the cha-pel seats and that we want to be good if 
we wore only let alone." 

We were going to pass some more res-o-lut-ions, — because they are a good deal easier 
and lots more fun to pass than examinations, — when some Soph-o-mores came and made 
noise that we were for-ced to shut our ears un-til we got out of the room. 

We want to be ve-ry wise and in-tend to stu-dy hard so that we can please our 
teachers. Horjing that you will be pleas-ed with our his-tory we re-main ever-yours, 

'98. 



34 



*Tresf)ir>an Class. 

Class Aotto : 

Tb vo;it(T[w. (Piprarou (Pp6vYj(Ji<$. 

Class Colors : 

Citerry Red and Lemon. 

Class qell: 

BOOM-A-LANGA ! BOOM-A-LANGA ! RAH-RAH-RATE ! 
BOOM-A-LANGA ! BOOM-A-LANGA ! NlNETY-ElGHT ! 

CI+AS5 OFFICERS : 

EDWARD R. WRIGHT, President. 

LEO H. ROBBLNS, Vice President. 

HYMEN L. WEBER, Secretary. 

ROBERT B. SEARLE, Treasurer. 



^Presf)men. 

-^•the civAaa or i&?s.^ 

Classical Course* 

William Loyal Allen, Malone, A. A. <P. Hall. 

John Robert Babcock, Leonardsville, 9 Park Row. 

Henry Kendall Booth, Ottawa, 111., 8 S. H. 

Frank DeLaNoy Briggs, Tarrytown, y i r . T. House. 

Richard Sherman Cooktnham, Utica, 28 H. H. 

Albertie DeFrank, Utica, 25 H. H. 

Andrew Jackson Dewey, Watertown, W. V. House. 

Franklin Elmore, . Peru, A. A. <P. Hall. 

Charles Gideon Empie., Sharon, A.T. House. 

Frank IIalsly Finn, Middletown, A. K. E. House. 

Clemens James France, Johnstown, S. A. X. House. 

John Howard Holmes, St. Lonis, Mo., W. T. House. 

Harry Grant Kimball, Mt. llolley, N. J., 29 H. H. 

Ralph Smith Minor, Deposit, A. K. E. House. 

Edward John Noble, Brooklyn, A. A. $. Hall 

Edward Wilson Parmelee, Westernville, 29 H.H. 

Samuel Kempton Piercy, Brooklyn, 21 S. H. 

Edward North Reed, Troy, Prof. North's. 

Leo Henry Bobbins, Watertown, W. V. House. 

Edward Albert Rogers, Lockport, A, K. E. House. 

Robert Burt Searle, East Onondaga, A. 2". House. 

Eugene Richard Smith, Sidney, A. K.E. House. 

Lu< [us Kelsey Stevens, ... Clinton, Ct., 16 H. H. 

3G 



Harry Lovell Stone, Mexico, A.T. House. 

George Wade, Morley, 9 H. H. 

Hymen Lawrence Weber, Springville, 5 II. II. 

Neil Kirke White, Youngstown, ()., W.T. House. 

Edward Reynolds Wright, Waterville, X. W. House. 

Xatin Scientific Course, 

James Ellery Bristol, Fulton, 0. J. X. House. 

Stanley Locke Butler, . . . Utica, A. A. $. Hall. 

William Burgett Carver, Binghamton, X. W. House. 

Carl German Cunningham, Utica, S. A. X. House. 

Robert Goodenow Kelsey, College Hill, College St. 

Warren Isbell Lee, Bartlett, A. K. E. House. 

Byron Eugene Turnbull, Utica, A.T. House. 

Daniel Wells, . , Menominee, Mich., 2. <P. Hall. 




37 



f ELIyOW, IN POTION 3TUE*I. 

— v— 

David Hale Newland, A. B., (1894,) . . .Camden, Munich, Ger. 



(iRADUATE STUDENT, IN RESIDENCE. 



Arthur Melvin Payne, A. B., (1894,) . . . Oroton, 5 S. H. 



3PBCIAI9 5TUDENT3. 



Fred Richard Burke 
Alfred Lee Kessler, 



Second Year. 

Oxford, 32 S. H. 

Brandt, Pa., . 25 S. H. 

First Year. 

Thomas Cook Gifford, W. Camden, Marvin St. 

Marshal Pitkin Howard; . . . . Hay t's Corners, 24 11. H. 

Charles Robert Stanton, Oxford, X.W. House. 

George Theodore White. Detroit, Mich., . . . X.W. House 



38 



— e— 

Fellow, in Foreign Study, 1 

Graduate, in Eesidence, 1 

Seniors, 30 

Juniors, 33 

Sophomores, 31 

Freshmen, 39 

Special, ~. 6 

Total 141 



a^nnviATioNa. 

S. H. stands for Skinner Hall. H. H. stands for Huntington Hall. 



39 



Of FIGEF^S FOR 1894-95 

OF THE 

General 5ociei>£ 

OF HAm^TON ALUMI. 



President. 

Hon. Augustus S. Seymour, LL. D., '57, New Berne, N. C. 



Vice Presidents. 

Rev. Levi Parsons, D. D., '49, Mt. Morris, N. Y 
J. Ausburn Towner, '58, Washington, D. C. 
Prin. Levi D. Miller, Ph. D., '02, Bath, N. Y. 
Rev. Henry Ward, '62, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Executive Committee. 

Rev. Dwigiit Scovel, '54, Clinton. 

Rev. Abel S. Wood, '61, Maine. 

Charles M. Everett, '63, Clinton. 

Rev. William H. Bates, '65, Rochester. 

Elliot S. Williams, '67, Clinton. 

Prof. Andrew C. White, Ph. D., '81, Ithaca. 

Prof. Melvin G. Dodge, '90, Hamilton College. 

Prof. Walter T. Couper, '92, Hamilton College. 



Recording Secretary and Necrologist. 

Prof 1 . Edward North, LL. D., L. H. D. 



Corresponding Secretary. 

Prin. Asa G. Benedict, A. M., Clinton. 



HaIf=Century Annalist, (Class of 1845.) 
Charles Talbot Porter, Montclair, N. J. 

40 



OFflGERS fOR 1894-95 

OF THE 

Nev ^Ior£) OH Association 

OF HAttllsTON ALUJUSI. 

President— Rev. Charles E. Knox, D. D., '56, New York City. 

Vice Presidents — Hon. Chauncey S. Truax, D. D., '75 ; Hamilton B. Tompkins, '69 ; Dr. 

Isaac H. Hall, '59 ; Prof. Francis M. Burdick, '69. 
Corresponding Secretary — A. Norton Brock way, M. D., '57, 50 E. 126th St., New York. 
Recording Secretary — Prof. Chester Donaldson, '84. 
Treasurer — James S. Greves, '61. 
Executive Committee — President, David H. Cochran, LL. D., '50; Chester Huntington, 

'66 ; Gideon W. Davenport, '48; Walter B. Winchell, M. D., '80; Rev. James 

H. Hoadley, D. D., '70; J. Cong ar Bryan, M. D., '84. 

OFFieEF^S FOR 1894-95 

OF THE - 

Western (J^odafion 

OF HAttlL/Tori gLUi^NI. 

President — Hon. Breese J. Stevens, '54, Madison, Wis. 

Vice Presidents — George AV. Newcomb, '49, Chicago, 111. ; Hon. Horatio C. Burchard, 

'50, Freeport, III; Myron H. Beach, '53, Chicago, 111.; Frank H. Weigley, '75, 

Chicago, 111. 
Secretary — Henry Dwight Ames, '79, Chicago, 111. 
Treasurer — Charles C. Arnold, '85, Chicago, 111. 
Executive Committee — Franklin H. Head, '56, Chicago, 111.; J. Platt Underwood, '70 

Chicago, 111.; Corliss F. Willard, '92, Chicago, 111. 



OFFICERS FOF^ 1894-95 

OF THE 

Central New ^Iorl^ (J^otiatton 

OF HA?\Il5ToM gUIi^NI. 

President — Hon. Milton H. Merwin, LL. D., '52, Utica. 
Secretary — Theodore L. Cross, A. M., '81, Mann Building, Utica. 



OFFICERS FOR 1894-95 

OF THE 

Northern New ^Iorl^ (J^odatton 

OF HA.MILToM glSU-MNI. 

President — Hannibal Smith, A. M., '66, Watertown. 
Secretary — Samuel F. Bagg, A. M., '69, Watertown. 

41 



OFFISEF{S FOR 1894-95 

OF THE 

dJestern New Mior^ (J^ocictfton 

OF HAMILTON ALAMm. 
President — Rev. Henry Ward, '62, Buffalo. 
Secretary— John Otto, Jr., '81, 24 W. Seneca St., Buffalo. 



OFFICERS FOF^ 1894-95 

OF THE 

Rochester A^octafion 

OF HA?\Il5TON AI^-PINI. 

President — John S. Shepard, Esq., '60, Penn Yan. 
Secretary — William A. Hubbard, Jr., '72, Rochester. 



OFFICERS FOF£ 1894-95 



New England (J^ocictfion 

OF HAnil^ToN ALUnm. 
President — Charles Dudley Warner, L. H. D., '51, Hartford, Conn. 
Secretary — Rev. Martin D. Kneeland, D. D., '69, Roxbury, Mass. 

OFflCEF^S FOR 1894-95 

OF THE 

Washington (D. C) Association 

OF HA?YIL,ToN £LA4?im. 
President — Rev. Dr. William A. Bartlett, '52, Washington. 
Secretary — Ausburn Towner, '58, Washington, D. C. 



OFFICERS FOR 1894-95 

OF THE 

Aid-Continentat Association 

OF HA?\Il5/ToN 3LU?im. 
President — Clarence S. Palmer, '79, Kansas City, Mo. 
Secretary — Prof. Lee S. Pratt, '81, Galesburg, 111. 

42 



5iofma Pf)L 

— ©— 

f oUNDI^D (JT UNION COlXE<iR> 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 

Alpha of New York, Union College, 1827 

Beta of New York, Hamilton College, 1831 

Alpha of Massachusetts, .... Williams College, 1834 

Delta of New York, Hobart College, 1840 

Alpha of Vermont, University of Vermont, 1845 

Alpha of Michigan, University of Michigan, 1858 

Alpha of Pennsylvania, .... Lehigh University, 1887 

Epsilon of New York, Cornell University, 1890 



-\ 



II 



§ETA CHAPTER 

OP THE 

CSicrma PI)t Fraternity. 



ESTABLISHED 1831. 



Fratres in Facilitate. 

Rev. M. Woolsey Stryker, D. D., LL. D. 
Rev. Oren Root, D. D., Bratnard G. Smith, A. M., 

Charles Henry Smyth, Jr., Ph. D., Delos DeWolf Smyth, A. M. 

Fratres in Urbe. 

Frederick D. Smyth, A. R., 
Oren Root, Jr. 

Active Members. 

1895- 

Ely Buell, James Walton Carmalt, 

Horace Thornburgh Owen, John Barton Seymour. 

1896. 

Thomas Upson Chesebrough, Henry Jared Cookinham, Jr. , 

William Eugene Hewitt, Frederic Parkman Warfield. 

i8 97 . 

Allan Pepperell Ames, George Anderson, 

Horace Howard Bogue, Benjamin Robert Johnson. 

1898. 

John Robert Babcock, Richard Sherman Cookinham, 

Harry Grant Kimball, Edward Wilson Parmelee, 

Lucius Kelsey Stevens, Daniel Wells. 

45 



glpf)a Delta Pf)i. 



POUNDED QT MAAILTON CoLIsECiE, 



/?OZX OF CHAPTERS. 

Hamilton, Hamilton College, 1832 

Columbia, Columbia College, 1836 

Yale, Yale University, 1836 

Amherst, Amherst College, 1837 

Brunonian, Brown University, 1837 

Harvard, Harvard University, 1837 

Hudson, Adelbert College, 1841 

Bowdoin, Bowdoin College, 1841 

Dartmouth, . . Dartmouth College, 1845 

Peninsular, University of Michigan, 1846 

Rochester, Rochester University, 1850 

Williams, AVilliams College, 1851 

Manhattan, . . University of the City of New York, . . . 1855 

Middletown, Weslcyan University, 1856 

Kenyon, Kenyon College, 1858 

Union, . . • Union University, 1859 

Cornell, Cornell University, 1869 

Phi Kappa, . Trinity College, 1878 

Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins University, 1889 

Minnesota, University of Minnesota, 1892 

Toronto, University of Toronto, 1893 



46 



/ 



H^AILTON CHAPTER 

Alpl)a Delta Pf)i Fraternity. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1832. 



Fratres in Facilitate. 

Edward North, L. H. D., LL. D. 
Herman C. G. Brandt, A. M., Ph. D. Abel G. Hopkins, Ph. D. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Kev. Thomas B. Hudson, D. D. 
Joseph S. Avery, A. M. Robert B. Barrows, A. B. 

Walter S. Knowlson, A. B. James R. Benton, A. B. 

Henry Platt Osborne, A. B. Earle E. Woolwortii, A. B. 



Active Members. 

1893. 

William Wallace Chambers, I. John Greenwood, Jr., 

John Henry Myers, Jr.,* Anthony Nicholas Petersen, 

Clarence Stewart Wright. 

1896. 
Frank Wing Holmes, George Lewis Leech. 

1897. 

Hulbert Ten Eyck Beardsley, John Milton Holley, Jr., 

Winthrop Haight Hopkins, Alfred Lee Kesslek, 

Robert Gardner MacGregor, Theodore Medad Pomeroy,! 

Irving Dewey Williams. 

1898. 

William Loyal Allen, Harry Kendall Booth, 

Stanley Locke Butler, E. Franklin Elmore, f 

Edward John Noble, Edward North Reed. 



^Deceased. 
tLeft College. 



17 



Psi Upsilon. 



— ©— 

FOUNDED AT UNION £Ol9l^<iC 

ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 

Theta, Union College, 1833 

Delta, University of the City of New York, 1837 

Beta Yale University, 1839 

Sigma Brown University, 1840 

Gamma, Amherst College, 1841 

Zeta, Dartmou'h College, 1842 

Lambda, . . , Columbia College, . . 1842 

Kappa •; Bowcloin College, 1843 

Psi Hamilton College, 1843 

Xi vYesleyan University, 1843 

Qpsilok University of Rochester, 1858 

haw Kenyon College, 1860 

Phi University of Michigan, 1865 

I'i Syracuse University, 1875 

Cur Cornell University, 1876 

Beta Beta, Trinity College, 1880 

Ivr.\ Lehigh University, 1884 

Tau, University of Pennsylvania, . . . 1891 

Mr. University of Minnesota, 1891 



48 



'P}I CHAPTER 

P#i CIpsiton Fraternity 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



Fratre in Falcultate. 



* John William O'Brien, A. M., LL. B. 



Active Members. 

iS 9 5. 
Herbert Roswell Bates, George Herbert Geek 

Benjamin Hurd Thorp. 

1896. 

Louis Krum Richard Laird, Byron Brown Taggart, Jr. 

1897. 

Alfred Roy Ehman, Darwin Frank Pickard, 

Clarence Aubrey Fetterly, Henry Kitchell Webster 

1898. 

Frank DeLaNoy Briggs, John Howard Holmes, 

Andrew Jackson Dewey, Leo Henry Robbins, 

Neil Kirke White. 



*Died May 5, 1895. 



49 



Cf)t Psi. 

— © — 

POUNDED AT UNION COL/I^GE.. 

tUl. 



ROLL OF ACTIVE ALPHAS. 

Pi, Union College. 

Theta, Williams College. 

Mu, Middlebury College. 

Alpha, Wesleyan University. 

Phi, Hamilton College. 

Epsilon, University of Michigan. 

Upsilon, Furman University. 

Beta, South Carolina College. 

Chi, Amherst College. 

Tau, Woffard College. 

Nu, University of Minnesota. 

Iota, University of Wisconsin. 

Rho, Rutgers College. 

Xi, Stevens Institute of Technology. 

Alpha Delta, University of Georgia. 

Beta Delta, Lehigh University. 



50 




Cc/yryMid /tn iy 



r 



ALPHA PHI 

0)i P$i Fraternity. 



ESTABLISHED 1845. 



Fratre in Facilitate. 

Clinton Scollard, '81. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Charles Morton Everett, '(53. 
Conway Alonzo Frost, E. '90. 



Active Members. 

1895- 

Herbert Ray Burgess, John Groves Everett 

Orlando Eaton Ferry. 

1896. 

John Arden Ferguson, Charles Willard Rice, 

Charles Archibald Green, Neile Fassett Townee. 

1897. 

Fred Rickard Burke. 

iSgS. 
William Burgett Carver, George Theodore White, 

Charles Robert Stanton, Edward Reynolds Wright. 



51 



Delta Upsilon. 

FOUNDED AT WILUAA3 COE^CiB, 



ACTIVE CHAPTERS. 

Williams, Williamstown, Mass., 1834 

Union, Schenectady, N. Y., 1838 

Hamilton, Clinton, N. Y., 1847 

Amherst, Amherst, Mass., 1847 

Colby Waterville, Me., 1850 

Rochester, Rochester, N. Y., 1852 

Middlebury, Middlebnry, Vt., 1856 

Bowdoin, Brunswick, Me., 1857 

Rutgers, New Brunswick, N. J., 1858 

New York, New York City, 1865 

Adelbert, Cleveland, Ohio, 1865 

Colgate, Hamilton, N. Y., 1866 

Brown, Providence, R. I., 1868 

Cornell, Ithaca, N. Y., 1869 

Marietta, Marietta, Ohio, 1869 

Syracuse, Syracuse, N. Y., 1873 

Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., 1876 

Northwestern, Evanston, 111., 1880 

Harvard, Cambridge, Mass., 1882 

Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., 1885 

Columbia, New York City, 1885 

Lafayette, Easton, Pa., 1885 

Lehigh, South Bethlehem, Penn., 1885 

Tufts, College Hill, rMass., 1886 

De Pauw, Green Castle, Ind., 1887 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Penn., 1888 

Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., 1890 

Technology, Boston, Mass., 1891 

Swarthmore, Swarthmore, Penn., 1894 

52 



HAAILTON CHAPTER 

OF THE 

*Delia Clpsilon Fraternity. 

ESTABLISHED 1847. 



Fratres in Facilitate. 

Rev. Wm. Harder Squires, A. M. 
Melvin Gilbert Dodge, A. B. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Rev. Edward Paysen Powell, 

Rev. Dwight Scovel, 
Rev. Chester Warren Hawley. 



Active Members. 

•895- 

Burton Marcus Balch, Jay Herbert MacConnell, Friend Hull Miller, 

George Erwin Stone, *Frank Alexander Burrows. 

1896. 

Frank Pattengill Knowlton, Arthur Dwight Scovel, 

William Throop Moore, Harry Barnes Ward. 

1897. 

Albert Wilhelm Boesche, James Bruce Turnbull, Henry White. 

1S9S. 

Charles Gideon Empie, Robert Burt Searle, 

Thomas Cook Gipford, Harry Lovell Stone, 

Byron Eugene Turnbull, 



*Deceased. 



Delta F)Ctppa BPsiton. 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 

Phi, Yale College, 1844 

Tiieta, Bowdoin College, 1844 

Xi, Colby University, 1845 

Sigma, Amherst College, 1846 

Psi, University of Alabama, 1849 

Upsilon, Brown University, 1850 

Chi, Mississippi University, 1850 

Beta, University of North Carolina, 1851 

Eta, University of Virginia, 1852 

Kappa, Miami University, 1852 

Lambda, Kenyon College, 1852 

Pi, Dartmouth College, 1853 

Alpha Alpha, Middlebnry College, 1854 

Iota, Central University, 1854 

Omicrox, University of Michigan, 1855 

Epsilox, Williams College, 1855 

Pviio, Lafayette College, 1855 

Nu, University of the City of New York, . . . 1856 

Tat, Hamilton College, 1856 

Mu, Colgate University, 1856 

Beta Phi, University of Rochester, 1856 

Phi Chi, Rutgers College, 1861 

Psi Phi, DePauw University, 1866 

Gamma Phi, Wesleyan University, 1867 

Psi Omega, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1867 

Beta Chi, A delbert College, 1868 

Delta Chi, Cornell University, 1870 

Pur Gamma, Syracuse University, 1871 

Beta Beta, Columbia College, 1874 

Tifeta Zeta, University of California, 1876 

Alpha Chi, Trinity College, 1879 

Gamma, Yanderbilt University, 1889 

Phi Epsilon, Uuiversity of Minnesota, 1889 

Sigma Tau, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, . .1890 

Delta Delta, University of Chicago, 1893 

54 





Dr.efaa..JR'h£La, . 



r 



TAH CHAPTER 

OF THE 

Delta I^appa Bp^ilon PraternitY- 



ESTABLISHED 1856. 



Fratre in Facultate. 

Walter Thomas Couper, A. M. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Elliott Strong Williams, '67. 

Rev. Julian Henry Myers, $. L\ '79. 

Arthur Melvin Payne, A. B. 



Active Members. 

1895- 

William Andrew Aiken, Samuel Gilmore Palmer. 

1896. 

Alexander Alison, Jr., Arthur Ten Eyck Warner, 

Gardner Weeks Wood. 

1897. 

Bertrand Whitcomb Babcock, James Madison Glass, 

Crosby Jordan Beakes, Joshua Edwin Sweet, 

David Adelbert Davy, James Albert Winans. 



George Willard Daly, Ralph Smith Minor, 

Frank Halsey Finn, Samuel Kempton Piercy, 

Robert Goodenow Kelsey, Edward Albert Rogers, 

Warren Isbell Lee. Eugene Richard Smith. 

55 



Tl)cta Delta CH 

--©— 
POUNDED AT UNION COI^L^Cj^, 

1U6. 



Delta, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, . . 1853 

Zeta, Brown University, 1853 

Eta, Bowdoin College, 1854 

Theta, Kenyon College, 1854 

Iota, Harvard University, 1856 

Kappa, Tufts College, 1856 

Xi, Hobart College, 1857 

Sigma, Dickinson College, 1861 

Phi, Lafayette College, 1866 

Chi, Rochester University, 1867 

Psi, Hamilton College, 1867 

Omicron Deuteron, Dartmouth College, 1869 

Beta, Cornell University, 1870 

Lambda, Boston University, 1876 

Pi Deuteron, College of the City of New York,. . 1881 

Riro Deuteron, Columbia College, 1883 

Nu Deuteron Lehigh University, 1884 

Mu Deuteron, Amherst College, 1885 

Epsilon Deuteron, Yale University, 1887 

Gamma Deuteron, University of Michigan, 1889 

Iota Deuteron, Williams College, 1891 

Tau Deuteron, University of Minnesota, 1892 



56 




/ 



Dr.ekit.Phila. 



P3I CHANGE 

OP THE 

Tf)eta Delta C)t Fraternity. 

FOUNDED 1867. 

Fratres in Urbe. 

Prof. A. G. Benedict, Cpias. T. Ives. 

Active Members. 

,8 95 . 

John Harvey Lee, James Henry Foster, 

Joseph Irwin France. 

1896. 

Oscar Albert Knox. 

1S97. 

David Gwilim George, Forest Rose, 

Percy Allen Rose. 

1898. 

James Rogan Bachman, James Ellery Bristol, 

Carl German Cunningham, Clemens James France. 



57 



Tbeta 1% Epsilon. 

(50PHO?!OR^ FRATERNITY.) 

— © 

ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 

Alpha, Wesleyan University. 

Beta, Syracuse University. 

Gamma, Union College. 

Delta, Cornell University. 

Epsilon, Rochester University. 

Zeta, University of California. 

Eta, Colgate University. 

Theta, Kenyon College. 

Iota, . . • . Adelbert College. 

Kappa, Hamilton College. 

Lambda, Rensselaer Poly. Institute. 

Mu, Stephens Inst, of Theology. 

NUj Lafayette College. 

Xi, Amherst College. 

Omicron, Allegheny College. 

Pi, Lehigh University. 

Rho, . ... Dickinson College. 



58 



r 



FAPPA CHAPTER 

OK THE 

TI)eta Na Epsilon Fraternity. 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Fratres in Facilitate. 

Walter Thomas Coupee, A. M., Delos DeWolf Smyth, A. M. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Henry Platt Osborne, A. B. 
Arthur Melvin Payne, A. B. 



Active Members. 

,8 95 . 



William Andrew Aiken, 
William Wallace Chambers, 
James Henry Foster, 
Joseph Irwin France, 
George Herbert Geer, 



Alexander Alison, Jr., 
Thomas Upson Chesebrough, 
Henry Jared Cookinham, Jr. 
William Eugene Hewitt, 
Frank Wing Holmes, 



Isaac John Greenwood, Jr., 
John Harvey Lee, 
Samuel Gilmore Palmer, 
Anthony Nicholas Petersen, 
Clarence Stewart Wright. 



Oscar Albert Knox, 
Louis Krum Richards Laird, 
George Lewis Lekcii, 
Byron Brown Taggart, Jr., 
Arthur Ten Eyck Warner, 



Gardner Weeks Wood. 



l8 9 7. 



K ff M u C g K e c ; C || e M 7 v, 

H M M Q z j ! X z L & M u 9. 

XekLJMutffiC. 

9 z j S (3 : : I h 6 6 6 L W z j ffi 

E : : ffl z i b 9 g z 7 7 E M i j 11. 

K M 6 ffi z J a o e M e n. 

o e : : || y c M 9 g Y c o L (3 R W 1. 



6G70Cu||dyeM::Hffi.i 

btffilGMen Q e C 5, 

; 6 7 C n || M 6 11 c 

M T Z C .E |j D F i L ? u C 4 6 

S M T C ffi i I) 7 ff c fi n. 

c 7 ; : : C 9 ff O C 11 n 7 C k 

HcpzH??C6::94C. 



eJ 



2 I 6 j f 6 tt ff ff v S k. 



59 



Pf)i P>efa I^appa. 

— ®— 

ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 

Alpha of Maine, Bowdoin, Brunswick, Me. 

Alpha of New Hampshire, Dartmouth, Hanover, N. H. 

Alpha of Vermont, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. 

Beta of Vermont, Middle! >ury, Middlebury, Vt. 

Alpha of Massachusetts, Harvard, Cambridge, Mass. 

Beta of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, Mass. 

Gamma of Massachusetts, Williams, Williamstown, Mass. 

Alpha of Connecticut, Yale, New Haven, Conn. 

Beta of Connecticut, Trinity, Hartford, Conn. 

Gamma of Connecticut, Wesleyan, Middletown, Conn. 

Alpha of New York, Union, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Beta of Nsw r York, University of the City of New York. 

Gamma of New .York, College of the City of New York. 

Delta of New York Columbia, New York City. 

Epsilon of N T Ew r York, Hamilton, Clinton, N. Y. 

Zeta of NeW' York, Hobart, Geneva, N. Y. 

Eta of New York, Colgate University, Hamilton, N. Y. 

Theta of "New York, Cornell, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Iota of New York, Rochester University, Rochester, N. Y 

Beta of Ohio, Kenyon, Gambier, Ohio. 

Alpha of Pennsylvania, Dickinson, Carlisle, Penn. 

Gamma of Pennsylvania, Lafayette, Easton, Penn. 

Iota of Pennsylvania, Lehigh, South Bethlehem, Penn. 

Alpha of New Jersey, . . . Rutgers, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Alpha of Indiana, f. . . . De Pauw, Green Castle, Ind. 

Alpha of Kansas, State University of Lawrence, Kan. 

Alpha of Illinois, Northwestern, Evanston, 111. 



60 



N. *I. LP£lLoN CHAPTER 



Pf)i geta Rapper Fraternity. 



OFFICERS FOR^ 1594,-5. 

President, 

Hon. Augustus S. Seymour, LL. D. 

Vice Presidents, 

Rev. Prof. W. R. Terrett, D. D., Rev. Prof. W. H. Squires, 

Prof. A. D. Morrill. 

Secretary, 

Prof. Edward North, L. H. I)., LL. D. 

Assistant Secretary, 

Prof. M. G. Dodge. 

Treasurer, 

Rev. Prof. A. G. Hopkins, Ph. D. 

Marshal, 

Arthur M. Payne. 



61 



FR3TRF5 in URRE. 



Prof. Edward North, L. H. D., LL. D. 

Rev. E. P. Powell, A. M. 

Rev. Peof. Oren Root, D. D. 

Rev. Prof. A. G. Hopkins, Ph. I). 

Prof. A. G. Benedict, A. M. 

Peof. B. G. Smith, A. M. 

Prof. A. I). Morrill, A. M. 

Prof. Edward Fitch, A. M. 

Rev. Prof. W. II. Squires, A. M. 

Prix. W. C. Knowlson, A. M. 

Prof. W. T. Coffer, A. M. 

Oren Root, Jr., A. B. 



Rev. T. B. Hudson, I). D. 
Rev. Dwight Scovel, A. M. 
Prof. C. AV. Hawley, A. M. 
Rev. Prof. W. R, Terrett, D. D. 
Prof. II. G. G. Brandt, Ph. D. 
Pres. M. W. Stryker, I). D., LL. D. 
Prof. Clinton Scollard, A. M. 
Prof. C. II. Smyth, Jr., Ph. D. 
Prof. S. J. Saltnders, D. Sc. 
Prof. M. G. Dodge, A. M. 
Arthur M. Payne, A. B. 
John J. Ward, A. B. 



AFARFE^ FFFCTFR FROA '.9*. 



Theodore F. Collier, 
I). II. II. Naylor, 
Leuoy F. ( )strander, 
( )RF\ Root, Jr., 



James A. Minor, 
David II. Newland, 
Arthur M. Payne, 
John J. Ward. 



Fraternity Conventions. 



SIGMA PHI. 

New York City, January 3, 1895. 

Delegate, 

John Barton Seymour. 

ALPHA DELTA PHI. 

New York City, May 16, 17, 18, L895. 

Delegates, 

J.J. Greenwood, Jr., William W. Chambers 



PSI UPSILON. 

Utica, N. Y., May 8, 9, 10, 1895. 



Delegates, 
Benjamin H. Thorp, Louis K. R. Laird. 



DELTA UPSILON. 

Schenectady, N. Y., Oct, 25, 2(5, 1894. 

Delegates, 
J. 1J. MacConnell, Arthur D. Scovel. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 

Sherry's, 5th Ave., New York, Nov. 13, 14, 15, L894. 
Delegates, 

AVilliam A. Atken, Samuel G. Palmer. 



THETA DELTA CHI. 

New York City, Nov. 27, 28, 1894. 

Delegate, 

J. Irwin France. 



03 



Prices Awarded in l&yl. 



/. First Award of the Root Fellowship in Physical Science. 

' ' Department of Geology and Mineralogy, ' ' 

David Hale Newland, "Camden. 

2. Thirty=ninth Clark Prize in Original Oratory. 

"The Agitator in American History," 

Arthur Melvin Payne, Croton. 

3. Thirty =second Pruyn Medal Oration. 

"Municipal Misrule a National Peril," 

Theodore Frelinghuysen Collier, Clinton. 

4. Thirty = first Head Prize Oration. 

"Alexander Hamilton and the Code of Honor," 

Leroy Farrington Ostrander, Lyons. 

5. Twenty=second Kirkland Prize Oration. 

"The Human Purpose of Hebrew Legislation." 

Arthur Melvin Payne, Croton. 

6. Twenty=second Kellogg Prize A ward in Rhetoric. 

j 1. Arthur Melvin Payne, Croton. 
I 2. John Joseph Ward, Clinton. 

7. McKinney Prizes, in the Twenty=seventh Extemporaneous Debate. 

"That a National Income Tax Would be Unwise and Unjust." 

f 1. George Ansel Watrous, Bingham ton. 

\ 2. Theodore Freylinghuysen Collier, Clinton. 

8. Underwood Prize in Chemistry. 

Leroy Farrington Ostrander, Lyons. 



9. Munson Prizes in German. 



10. Southworth Prize in Physics. 

No award. 



1. John Joseph Ward, Clinton. 

2. Leroy Farrington Ostrander, Lyons. 



65 



//. Second Darling Thesis Prize. 

"The Diplomatic History of the United States from the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence to the Peace of 1783." 

Award equally divided. 

f Edwin Carlos Baker, New Hartford. 

1 Daniel Henry Howard Nayloe, Pulaski. 

12. Second Soper Thesis Prize. 

" Protection and the Standard of Living in the United States," 

Arthur Melvin Payne, Croton. 



13. Tompkins Mathematical Prizes. 



1. James Henry Foster, Verona. 

2. George Erwin Stone, Mexico. 
Medal — Friend Hull Miller, Bath. 






14. Curran Medals in Greek and Latin. 



15. Hawley Classical Medals. 



16. Munson Prizes in French. 



I ({old Medal — James PIenry Foster, Verona. 
\ Silver Medal — George Clark, Jr., Ensenore. 



William Andrew Aiken, Auburn. 
John PIaryey Lee, Franklinville. 
Millard Claude Loomis, Oxford. 
William Emmet Pettit, Wilson. 



( 1. Burton Marcus Balcii, Utica. 
{ 2. Friend Hull Miller, Bath. 



17. Chauncey S. Truax Greek Scholarship { in Class 1895. ) 

James Henry Foster, Verona. 

18. Edward Huntington Mathematical Scholarship, {in Class of 1895. ) 

George Erwin Stone, Mexico. 



19. Munson German Scholarship, (in Class of 1895. ) 



George Clark, Jr., Ensenore. 



20. Brockway Entrance Prize, {in Class of 1897. 



f Prize — Benjamin Robert Johnson, Albany. 
I Second Place — Allan Pepperel Ames, Albany. 



21. Kellogg Prizes for English Essays. 



Juniors, 
Class of 1895. 



Sophomores, 
Class of 1896. 



{ " The Essays of Plutarch." 

J Prize — -William^Andeew Atken, Auburn. 

| il The Mission o)f Comedy." 

I Prize — James Henry Foster, Verona. 

"The Story and Song of Keats." 
Prize — Arthur TenEyck Warner, Richmondville. 
Mention — Harry Barnes Ward, Buffalo. 
"The Pilgrim's Progress and the Imitation of Christ." 
I Prize — Feedeeic Paekman Warpield, Canandaigua. 



m 



Freshmen, 
Class of 1897. 



" Hamilton — Academy and College, from 1800 to 182£ 

Prize — Clarence Aubrey Fetterly, Utica. 

Mention — Winthrop IIakiiit Hopkins, Palmyra. 
| "The History and Genius of Wales." 
| Prize — James Albert Winank, Sidney Centre. 

Mention — Cuthbert Charles Frost, Syracuse. 



22. McKinney Prizes in Declamation 
Class of 1895. 



1. John Harvey Lee, Franklinville, 

2. James Walton Carmalt, Clinton 



Class of 1896. 



1. Henry Jared Cookinitam, Jr., Utica. 

2. William Throop Moore, Saratoga Springs. 



Class of 1897. 



I 1. Robert Gardner MacGiiegor, Utica 
\ 2. Henry White, Holland Patent, 




aCHOI,3R3HIP M0N0R5. 



CLASS OF 1894. 

High Honor Men, Standing 9.3, or Higher: 

Arthur Melvin Payne, Valedictorian. 
Leroy Farrington Ostrander, Salutatorian. 
Daniel Henry Howard Naylor, 
Dayid Hale Newland, 
John Joseph Ward. 

Honor Men, Standing 8.9 to 9.3. 

Theodore Frelinghuysen Collier, 
James Albert Minor, 
Oren Root, Jr. 



*•: 



DEPARTMENT HONOR3 



CLASS OF 1894. 

In Greek, Ethics, History and Law, Rhetoric and Oratory 

Arthur Melvin Payne. 

In Psychology and Logic, and Chemistry: 

Leroy Farrington Ostrander. 

In Geology and Mineralogy, French, and German: 

David Hale Newland. 
In Mathematics: 

Daniel Henry Howard Naylor. 
In Latin: 

Theodore Frelinghuysen Collier. 



08 



^Decrree^ Conferred, l&yl. 



A. B., IN COURSE, JUNE 28. 



Edwin Carlos Baker, 
Dwight Herman Colegrove, 
Theo. Freltnghuysen Collie 
Warren Harkness Everett 
Lewis Nathaniel Foote, 
Cornelius Joseph Gibson, 
Frank Curtis Goulding, 
Warren Porter Hunt, 
David Hull McM aster, 
Thomas John Mangan, 
Willis Nathaniel Mills, 

George 



James Albert Minor, 

Daniel Henry Howard Naylor, 
cr, David Hale Newland, 

Leroy Farrington Ostrander, 

Arthur Melvin Payne, 

David Lincoln Roberts, 

Oren Root, Jr., 

Nicholas Schmeckenbecher, 

Aaron Carroll Stuart, 

Ralph Waterman Vincent. 

John Joseph Ward, 
Ansel Watrous. 



A. B., EX GRATIA. 

Robert McLean, '75. 
George Hastings Lee, '85. 
Benjamin Walsworth Arnold, '86. 
Fred Brierly Waite, '88. 
William Wadsworth Miller, '89. 

A. B., HONORARY. 

Noah Webtser, Brewerton. 

A. M., IN COURSE. 



Prof. George William Ellis, '78. 
Archibald Chas. McLachlan, '81. 
John Bessner Huber, M. D., '87. 
Rev. Eugene Langdon Conklin, '90. 
Prof. Melvin Gilbert Dodge, '90. 
Rev. Jos. Darling Ibbotson, Jr., '90. 
Roscoe Belden Martindale, '90. 



Jacob Willis Fowler, '91. 
Prof. Duncan Campbell Lee, '91, 
Eugene Harvey Northrup, '91. 
Ransom Henry Snyder, '91. 
Albert Emerson Stuart, '91. 
Philip Ward, LL. B., '91. 
Percy Loyal Wight, '91. 



Jacob Shannon Wilkes, '91 



69 



A. M., UPON EXAMINATION. 

Daniel WyEtte Burke, '93. 

A. M., EX GRATIA. 

Orrin Cedesman Stevens, v 7'2. 
Philip Keck, '75. 

A. M., AD EUNDEM. 

Charles Butler Rogers, \S7. Hiram Horsburgh Bice, '89. 

Prin. Frank 1 )a\ t ii) Boynton, (Middlebury, '91,) Ithaca. 

A. M., HONORARY. 

Ebenezer K. Wright, New York City. Thomas E. Finnegan, Albany. 
John DeWitt Rexford, '44, Janesville, Wis. 

M. S., HONORARY. 

Albert Leffingwell, M. D., '70, Summit, N. J. 

PH. D., HONORARY. 

Frank Wallace Jennings, '7 ( .), Oneida. 

Prin. Albert Leonard, Bingliamton. 

Key. William DeLoss Love, Jr., '73, Hartford, Ct. 

Prin. Joseph Carlton Norris, Canandaigua. 

D. D., HONORARY. 

Rev. Ebenezer Hazard Snowdlw, '18, Dorrance, Pa. 
Rev. Hoi; ack Publius Virgilius Bogue, '63, Avon 
Rev. Thomas Ccjmings Hall, (Princeton, '79,) Chicago, 111. 
Rev. William Reed, '71, Troy. 

LL. D., HONORARY. 

Hon. Charles Anthony Hawley, '59, Seneca Falls. 
I fox. Elihu Root, '64, New York City. 



HAMILTON COLLEGE 

THE THIRTY-NINTH 



Claris Prise Exhibition in Oratory 



MAY 29, 1894. 

— ©— 



prater. 



1. " Gordon and Havelock as Types of Christian Soldiers," 

Willis Nathaniel Mills. 

2. "the Debt of Liberty to the Netherlands," 

Leroy Farrington Ostrander. 



3. li The Agitator in American History, " . . . . Arthur Melvin Payne. 

4. " Gordon and Havelock as Types of Christian Soldiers," 

David Lincoln Roberts. 



nusiC 



5. " The Agitator in American History, " John Joseph Ward. 

6. " The American Locomotive Engineer, " . . . George Ansel Watrous. 



nu^ic 



Swar&fncj of tbe lP>ri3C. 



71 



1&13-1S94. 



^Hamilton College. 



Sigl)t^-5econd Commencement. 



I}ACC3IvAUK£ATE DAU. 
Sunday, June 24th. 

The Baccalureate Sermon, to the class of 1894, by President M. Woolsey Stryker, D. D., 

LL. D., at 11 a. m., in the Stone Church in Clinton. 
Annual Report of the Y. M. C. A. by the retiring President, David Lincoln Roberts, '94, 

and the Annual Address, by the Rev. George William Knox, D. D., '74, at 7:30 p. m., 

in the Stone Church. 

CAAPU3 D(j^I. 

Monday, June 25th. 

Campus Day exercises at 3 p. m., on College Hill. 

M< Kinney Prize Declamation, at 7:30 p. m., in the Stone Church. 

CL(353 f A*I. 
Tuesday, June 26th. 

Entrance Examinations, beginning at <S a. m., in the West Room of the Chapel. 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Trust, at 2 p. m., in the Chapel of the Stone Church. 






Memorial Class Day of '94, at 2:30 p. m., in the Stone Church. 
McKinney Prize Debate, at 7:80 i>. m., in the Stone Church. 
Reception of tiie Class of '94, at 10:30 p. u., in the Soper Gymnasium. 

AL.UANI DQ^I. 

Wednesday, June 27th. 

Adjourned Session of the Board of Trust, at 9:30 a. m., in the Faculty Room of Library 
Hall. 

Annual Meeting of the General Society of the Alumni, at 10 a. m., in the College 
Chapel. 

President, the Rev. Luther A. Ostrander, D. D., '65. 
Half- Century Annalist, the Rev. David A. Holbrook, D. D., '44. 
Necrologist, Professor Edward North, LL. D., L. H. D., '41. 

Election of Graduate Trustee, for four years, to succeed Thomas D. Catlin, A. M., 
whose term ended upon this date. 

Reunions of the Anniversary Classes. 

Base Ball Game of Graduates against Undergraduates, at 2:30 p. m., upon the Athletic 
Field. 

Reception, by the President and Mrs. Stryker, from 4 to 6 p. m., at their residence on 
College Hill. 

Symposium of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, at 7:30 p. m., in the Stone Church. 

Thursday, June 28th. 

The Eighty-second Annual Commencement, at 10:30 a. m., in the Stone Church. 
Alumni Dinner, at 2 p. m. , in Scollard Hall. 



73 



x .. .iifct,- ,;/,,.„ _^ 




V ■ 



Hamilton Collecre. 



CAAPU5 d;vi. 

June 25th. 1H<)4. 

President Cornelius Joseph Gibson. 

Orator John Joseph Ward. 

Poet Theodore Frelinghi yh.n Collie 

Response from } 95, Burton Marcus Balch. 

Response from *96 : . : Edward Silas Babcock. 

Response fn.m '97 Fred Rickard Bi rke. 



- 



« 



- : 



Hamilton College. 



(%<J33 DAIL 

June 26th, 1894. 



President, 

Orator, . 
I 'iirt, . . 
Historian, 
Prophet, . 



( i EORGE A.NSEL WATROUS. 

Arthub M elvijn Payne. 

LEROY FARRINGTON < >STRANDER 
1 >AVID I I ALE N i:\\ !. V.ND. 

Willis Nathaniel M mi.-. 



presentation Committee. 

David Lincoln Roberts, Xk holas S< hmeckenbecher, 

Aaron ( !arroll Stuart. 



AVcFjtnneY Pri^e Content 

IN DECLARATION, 
MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 2$, 1894. 



flfousic. 



FRE3MAEN, '97. 



David Adelbert Davy, What the Victory Meant, G. W. Curtis. 

Robert Gardner MacGregor, . . Daniel O'Connell, Phillips. 

Henry White, The Poetry of War, Robertson. 

James Albert Winans, The Beginning of the End, McKinley. 



/IftUSlC. 



aoPHonoi^a, '?6 



Horace Greeley Atwater, .... The Problem of To-day, George. 

Carl Augustus Babtist, Russian Nihilism, Phillips. 

Henry Jared Cookiniiam, Jr., . . The Death of Lincoln, Whitman. 

William Thkoop Mooke, Roscoe Conkling, Ingersoll. 



/IftllStC. 



JUNIOR3, '95. 



James Walton Carmalt, Sentimentality vs. Law, M. Thompson. 

William Wallace Chambers, . . . Oliver Cromwell, Anon. 

Joseph Irwin France, John Brown, Tourgee. 

John Harvey Lee, JEulogy on Henry W. Grady, Anon. 



/IRusic. 



AWARDS. 



7<; 



THE TWENTq-3nVRNTM 

^VcFjinne^ Prt£e Exhibition 

IN 1^XT£AP0UANP0(IS DPiyVIP, 

TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 26, 1894. 



IP tavcr. 



nu$ic. 



Question: — Resolved, "That a National Income Tax Would he Unwise 
and Unjust." 

Affirmative : 
Leroy F. Ostrander, Lyons. 
Arthur M. Payne, Croton. 
George A. Watrous, Binghamton. 

Negative: 
Theodore P. Collier, Clinton. 
James A. Minor, Deposit 
David L. Roberts, Port Leyden. 



Closing Brguments ot tbe debaters, 
Bnnouncement of B\vart>3. 



a^ii v \po5iun 

OF THE 

EpSilon Chapter of PI)t Beta F> appa 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 27th, 1894. 



" The Relation of Scholarship to Success in 
Lifer 



Music, 

1. Rev. Sherman W. Bkoavn, '87, Spencer, Mass. 

2. Professor Theodore C. Burgess, '83, State Normal School, Fredonia. 

8. Rev. Dean George Hodges, '77, Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Mass. 

/IDusic. 

4. Rev. President Charles C. Hemenway, '74, . . . Pritchett Institute, Glasgow, Mo. 

5. Rev. Horace P. V. Bogue, '63, Avon. 

6. Hon. William H. H. Miller, ^61, . . Indianapolis, Ind. 

/IDusic. 

7. Hon. Charles A. Hawley, '59, Seneca Falls. 

8. Hon. Ansel J. Nortiirup, '58, Syracuse. 

78 



Commencement Exercises 

HAAII5T0N Colvi^CiE. 

STONE CHURCH, CLINTON, N. Y., 
THURSDAYJIINE 28TH, 1894. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

MUSIC, 

Latin Salutatory with High Honor, and the Head Prize Oration — 
"Alexander Hamilton and the Code of Honor," 

Leroy Farrington Ostrander. 

Honor Orator, and Second Prize Debater, with the Pruyn Medal Oration — 

" Municipal Misrule a National Peril,". .Theodore Frelinghuysen Collier. 

music. 

Honor Oration — 

"Characteristics of Hebrew Poetry." James Albert Minor. 

Truax Scholar in Greek and Semi-first Darling Thesis, with High Honor Oration — 

"Orators of Revolutions," Daniel Henry Howard Naylor. 

MUSIC. 

Eliha Root Prize Fellow in Geology, with High Honor Oration — 

"Truths Revealed in Mineralogy," David Hale New land. 

Second Kellogg Prize Orcde/r, with High Honor (Jratioi — 

"America's Debt to John Bright," John Joseph Ward. 

MUSIC. 

Valedictorian with High Honor, Clark Prize Orator, First Kellogg Prize Orator, and s<,/><r 
Prize Thesis, with tlie Kirkland Prize Oration— 
"The Humane Purpose of Hebrew Legislation," . .Arthur Melvin Payne. 

MUSIC. 

Ipri^cs K\vart>ct» an& IDajrccs Conferred. 
BENEDICTION. 

IS) 




THE OLD ARBOR. 




HE NEW ARBOR. 



Collecre Dances. 



QPON entering College a man seldom expects that he will find there such 
diversions as receptions, dinners and balls. II', however, hehashada 
taste of them before he enters, it is not long before he feels that some- 
thing is lacking to him; and finally realizes that this something is 
woman's society. 

Possibly no College of its size, and but few of the larger ones, offers the 
social advantages to its students that Hamilton does. To enumerate the 1< mid- 
list of balls and receptions would be a tiresome catalogue, so we shall confine 
ourselves to the description of a few of the most important events of our 
social life. 

First, on the list comes the Prom, given by the Junior Class each year. 
How well we all remember as Freshmen, hearing the upper-classmen tell the 
stories of their different experiences at their first Prom., and depicting the 
sights they saw that night, — then so amusing and startling, and now only a 
part of onr own program. 

The Sophomore Hop follows the Prom, some time during the early part 
of winter term. The spring term then brings us the Freshman Frolic, an 
event which has sprung up in recent years. Finally comes Commencement, 
with the grandest ball of all — the Senior. Here all the men arc in their ele- 
ment. Examinations over (except for a few), with a girl that you used to 
know, or possibly a Freshman crush and a chaperon as your guests, the 
long series of parties and the festivities of Commencement week seem like 
a dream of bliss. 

Hamilton alumni are continually speaking of the magnificent situation 
of the college. When they say this it may be that they recall the vision of 
those dear, familiar buildings, Cottage and Houghton, "not so very far 
away. 1 ' These truly have their charms. Musicals, dramatics and recep- 
tions come to us thro' these happy mediums. 

Many men do not care for such gaieties, and find attractions in athletics, 
and even, strange as it may seem, in their books. We believe that it is right 
for those who wish to " bohn " to "bolm," for those who wish to dance to 
dance. It is justly held that a college man should make the most of his 
time in hard, honest work. But when an opportunity is offered for social- 
ity and recreation, let him not hesitate to make the most of it as well, and 
a broader-minded and stronger manhood will he the result. 

SI 








. V 



, iy 



5enior P>all. 



-^•CLA33 OP NINETY-POUR.- 

Soper Gymnasium, June 26 1894. 



Mrs. M. W. Stryker, Mrs. H. C. G. Brandt, 

Mrs. Clinton Scollard. 



Theodore F. Collier, James A. Minor, 

Oren Root, Jr. 



83 



X 



r^ 










4 * ! 'i3(n d 



« 



Junior Promenade, 



ClyA53 OF N1NET*I-3IX. 



Soper Gymnasium;, November 22, 1894. 



pgTRONn33E3. 

Mrs. M. W. Stryker, 



Mrs. H. C. (I. Brandt, 

Mrs. W. R. Terrett. 



Henry J. Cookinham, Jr., 



Oscar A. Knox, 

Neile F. Towner, 



s:> 



Tf)e Junior Promenade. 

-©- 

— VERY class carries away pleasant memories of its college days. In the mind of the 
^\ alumnus there is one secret gallery which, when the busy days crowd thick and 
' hard, he opens with pleasure, and turns away from the world for a time to gaze 
upon the pictures it contains — pictures of his college life in Old Hamilton. Ninety- 
six will have many such memories to recall, and among those that she will cherish with 
the greatest pride and affection will be the recollections of her " Hop " and her "Prom." 
As Sophomores we made the Sophomore Hop a permanent institution in Hamilton; and 
as Juniors we proved by our "Prom." that as far as dances are concerned, we know how to 
play the part of hosts most efficiently. 

Everything is evolved out of chaos. After the usual turmoil and excitement accom- 
panying an election, the committee was chosen and the date fixed. November 28th 
dawned clear and cold. The crowd of curious students that for several days had hung 
around the "Gym." in hope of catching a glimpse of the splendid preparations within, 
become more numerous and importunate. But their only reward was to sight now and 
then one of the Committee, transformed into a drayman and gathering furniture and 
various decorations from the different dormitories. 

The gymnasium was decorated for the first time in blue and buff. Festoons of bunt- 
ing, great flags enclosing quiet nooks, a massive bank of green behind which the orches- 
tra ensconced, and lastly the smooth expanse of white crash covering the floor, trans- 
formed the place into a fitting temple for Terpsichore. And fittingly was she worshiped 
that night. 

Every man and every girl was there for a good time. Never had the "Gym." looked 
more beautiful and never its fair inmates. Sweet music played as the hours rolled by 
and dancing feet sounded a soft echo to the rythm of the waltz. The dancer's eyes 
flushed joyously to the gleam of the gas-light, and merry hearts grew merrier as the joy 
of the occasion thrilled them. The patronesses — "not the faculty's wives," but the 
charming women whose lucky husbands are on the faculty — looked on with unconcealed 
enjoyment. 

But descriptions of college parties are trite and worn. Each one is like and yet un- 
like its predecessor; the dissimilarity consisting in the peculiar conception which each 
one derives from his own exxx-riences and which varys with the individual. 

In the wee small hours the last waltz was played. Patronesses smiled a tired fare- 
well and the scramble for carriages began. A long ride down the Hill, a sleepy good- 
night, and the Prom, was something to look back upon. 

80 



3opf)omore Mop. 



#<I9A33 OF NINFTq-aiA 



Soper Gymnasium, February 5, 1894. 



PATRON^33n3. 

Mrs. M. W. Stryker, 

Mrs. B. G. Smith, 

Mrs. A. G. Horkins, 

Mrs. Clinton Scollard. 



COAAITTM. 

J. Arden Ferguson. 
William E. Hewitt, 
Byron B. Taggart, Jr., 
Gardner W. Wood. 



5opl)omore Mop. 



^•CLAaa op hinet*i-3eveh.-£#- 

Soper Gymnasium, February 20, 1895. 

P(5Tbpn:£55E5- 

Mrs. M. W. Stryker, 

Mrs. W. R. Terrett, 

Mrs. A. G. Hopkins. 



COAAITTE^. 

Allan P. Ames, 



Fred R. Burke, 

Darwin F. Pickard. 



89 



5opI)omore Hop. 



THE twentieth of February was the date that marked an epoch in the history of 
Ninety-seven. In carrying out the precedent established by the class of Ninety- 
five, the class of Ninety- seven far surpassed all expectations. The Sophomore 
Hop had been the topic of conversation around College for several weeks. The 
honor of being on the Committee had been hotly contested ; but at last the 
proper arrangements were made and success was assured by promises from our sisters, 
and other fellows' sisters, to be present. 

The morning of the twentieth dawned bright and clear. The earth, clothed in its 
garment of glistening white, seemed to have put on its holiday attire. All day long here 
and there were seen students arranging programs for their partners and for themselves. 
" Want to exchange dances?" became the pass- word of the day; and toward evening a 
few alumni were seen about the campus looking up numbers. 

The report of the dance had spread to distant cities, and fair damsels came from 
the circles of the four hundred to make merry the hearts of students and lovers. 

During the day a steady stream of drays, furniture vans, and moving greenhouses, 
could be seen moving up the hill toward the Gym. On that night the sun seemed 
reluctant to sink behind the western hills; as if he was loth to lose sight of the coming 
gaiety. But the stars came out en masse and with jealousy viewed the rival lights that 
shone thro' the windows of the Gym. Never before had the Gym. so completely lost its 
character. It had been transformed, by a few dainty touches of the committee, into a 
magnificent ball-room. The flashing lights, reflected by draperies of College and Class 
colors, dazzled the eyes of the assembling throng of merry dancers. 

The sound of the old bell in the chapel tolling the hour of nine had scarcely died away, 
when out from the depths of a bower of ferns and evergreens, lightly the tones of an open- 
ing march rose and floated to the extreme end of the hall, quickly followed by the trip- 
ping maidens and gallant youths seeking the patronesses. As the last notes of the march 
died away, softly the sweet melody of a love song was wafted thro' the air announcing 
the first waltz. Eagerly and gracefully couple after couple, as they caught the inspiration, 
glided across the floor; and the Sophomore Hop was begun. 

Between the dances the window seats, shady nooks, and artistically concealed 
lounges, were rivals for popularity. At twelve o'clock refreshments were announced, 
and the new day was begun with feasting. It was a two-step that first aroused the 
drooping lids and flagging spirits, and soon the activity of the dance was aroused. It 
was four o'clock before the notes of the last waltz died away, and with many congratula- 
tions to the committee, the party slowly broke up; and the Sophomore Hop of Ninety- 
seven was a thing of the past. 



90 



Otf)er Social Event*}. 



Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


7. 


Jan. 


16. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


28. 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


22. 


Mar. 


11. 


April 27. 


May 


3. 


May 


10. 


May 


16. 


May 


17. 


May 


24. 


June 


4. 


June 


19. 



Sigma Phi entertains at Sig Hall. 

Dancing party at J. V. House. 

J. A. E. gives dance at Frat. House. 

Reception for Charles Dudley Warner at '/''. Y. House. 

Pumpkin Party at Cottage. Hallowe'en. 

Dance at 0. J. X, House. 

Dancing Party at -. <P, Hail. 

Thanksgiving Reception at Houghton. 

A. J. (P. Reception, Alpha Delta Phi Hall. 

Reception at J. h\ E. House. 

First of the Faculty parties at Mrs. Brandt's. 

Freshman Frolic, Scollard Opera House. 

The Young Ladies of Clinton receive at Onyan Opera House. 

Reception for Dr. and Mrs. Peck at -. #. Hall. 

German at '/'". V. House. 

Reception at 9. J. .V. House. 

February Reception at Houghton. 

Houghton Senior Coasting Party. 

Dance at Sig Hail. 

Dancing Class Reception at Scollard Opera House. 

Barrett-Browning at Houghton. c l Sharps and Flats. ' ' 

Dancing Party at A. J. €>. Hall. 

Musicale at Houghton. 

Reception at J. T. House. 

June Reception, Cottage. 

Houghton Reception. 



( .»l 



Ninety-Six Class Rapper. 

BAGG'S HOTEL, OCTOBER 28, 1893. 



COAAITTM. 
HENRY J. COOKINHAM, Jr., BYRON B. TAGGART, Jr., 

G. WEEKS WOOD. 

OFFICER^. 

President, FREDERIC P. WARFIELD. 

Toast Master, G. WEEKS WOOD. 

TOA£T3. 

1. CLASS OF '96, Byron B. Taggart, Jk. 

" Populi Sumus." 

'2. THE IDEAL SOPHOMORE, Oscar A. Knox. 

" He deals damnation Wound the land." 

3. THE FACULTY, Frank W. Holmes. 

" Empty kettles always rattle.''' 1 

4. WHEN '96 WAS YET YOUNG, Carl A. Babtist. 

11 Blessings on thee, little man, 
Barefoot hoy urith cheeks of tan." 

5. THE LADIES, THE LOVELY DEARS, H. J. Cookiniiam, Jr. 

"My only books 

Were woman's looks, 

And folly \s all they're taught me." 

6. CONQUESTS OF '96, Wm. T. Moore. 

" wherefore come ye forth, 
In triumph from the north, 
With your lances and swords and axes all red." 

7. A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE, J. Arden Ferguson. 

" For I heard the tread of pioneers of nations yet to be, 

The first low wash of waves where soon will roll a human sea." 

93 



TI)e Oct&s Ride and Rapper. 



TT happened a good while ago, the class ride and banquet, and the scribe's memory is 
somewhat clouded by the notes of time. But whatever he forgets, most of you can 
remember for yourselves. You must all remember something about it — excepting 
you who were then in prep, school, cultivating that beautiful chlorophyl which has 
made you so prominent in college. 

The Foot Ball team was to play Cornell in Utica on the 28th of October. This en- 
gendered an idea in some fertile brain, and when it ripened, this idea was carefully 
picked and laid before the class. The idea was that we ride to Utica in a tally-ho, see 
the game, have a banquet, and return — at least it was hoped that we would return. So 
a committee was appointed — as committees always are — and everything was arranged. 

The sun rose with great eclat on the morning of the 28th. After prayers for a safe 
expedition and other needful preparations, the class gathered at the foot of the hill, 
mounted the coach behind four fiery chargers, and we were off. Hewitt could not re- 
strain himself and began to sing ; ond but for the driver's presence of mind the horses 
would have bolted. Two men were detailed to sit on Hewitt and prevent the recurrence 
of such an outburst, while we listened to the scherzo which Turk executed on the fish 
horn with wonderful dexterity and power. 

Away we rolled, through the village, down Utica street and out into the country. 
The roads between Clinton and Utica are not remarkable for their smoothness, and the 
career of the coach was like that of a ship on a billowy sea. It was only by frequent 
doses of (Jack) Burdick's Blood Bitters that sea-sickness was prevented. 

The journey was without serious mishap, except that once Hewitt broke loose again, 
but was immediately silenced. New Hartford hove in sight, and was left behind. And 
at last we were coming into Utica. A last wild burst of speed from the noble animals 
that drew our chariot, and we were at the St. James. 

Of course you all know about the game, even the very few who were not there must 
have heard the wonderful story repeated ; and in days to come aged grandsires will tell 
over to listening, breathless children, how McNally (peace to his ashes) guyed the umpire, 
how Atwater tried to get into a small bickering with two or three people at once, and how, 
greatest of all, Naylor and Ealsten ploughed through Cornell for the touch-down. 

After the game everyone adjourned to the St. James to talk over the triumph and to 
wait for the banquet. The excitement of victory was so intense that Louis was even seen 
to take two glasses of ginger ale. 

94 



From this point on, the haze thickens before the mind's eye of your faithful scribe. 
The time was passed pleasantly in singing hymns and giving thanks ; until the time for 
the banquet. Then we went to Bagg's. There seems to be no doubt that there was a 
banquet, though on this important point the scribe is forgetful. There was a toast- 
master, chosen in the hope that he could master the toasts and not the toasts him. There 
were also many brilliant speeches made and pledges drunk. On the whole, the banquet 
was no less than a feast of reason and a flow of wit. 

At last it came to an end, like all good things, and we found ourselves waiting for 
the coach. "Everything comes to him who waits," and the coach w r as no exception. We 
got aboard the tally-ho, yelled once more for luck, and started up Genesee street. A fresh 
breeze had sprung up, and blew gently and pleasantly upon our heated brows. But soon 
the breeze became cold, and we dreamed of home and fireside and slippers, and such 
things. It is strange how much outside there was to that coach. We all began to appre- 
ciate what Pills means when he talks about zero cold. 

But the coach still rolled on, and we were fairly on the road to Clinton. Near the 
railroad tracks, Spotless remembered that he had forgotten his temperance tracts, and went 
back to get them. The cold seemed to increase constantly, and death appeared to 
be staring us in the face. Jake was on his knees, and we thought he was praying, uutil 
we heard him muttering "Say, do you know it?" Woody was wildly grasping at the 
air, and shrieking out at intervals the demoniacal laugh that has clung to him ever since. 
All would have been lost, had not some one found in Bacon's pocket, who was quietly 
asleep, the last pint of Burdick's bitters. With a hollow cry, Woody seized the precious 
bottle and began to wrap himself about its contents. We quietly but firmly disengaged 
him, and so were saved. 

Clinton was by this time not far away, and after a few more plunges and jerks we 
turned into the Square, past the Stone Church, up College street, and the ride was over. 
Then was realized the dreamed-of fire, the warm room-mate, and the peaceful sleep. 



(Jrtadne. 



B sailing o'er tbe ocean bine 

Went JBaccbus, gail£ roaming ; 
Bno witb btm were a joll£ crew 

Wlbo baon't an£tbing to oo 
JBut sing ano langb tbe wbole oa£ tbro\ 

Bno keep tbe beer=mugs foaming. 

TUpon an tslanO's oesert strano 

Gbere sat alone a matoen, 
Bno sbe sigbeo ano wept tbere, on tbe sanO, 

Bs sbe belo a fielo^giass in ber banc ; 
JBut tbere wasn't a man in sigbt of lanO, 

Bno ber beart witb grief was laoen. 

1ft cbanceo tbat JBaccbns saw ber tbere,— 

Sbe was a lovely creature,— 
BnO be soon relieved ber mino from care, 
dfor tbo' sbe saiO sbe oion't Oare 
Bs sbe baon't a single tbing io wear, 

Cbe\2 were weO, b£ tbe islano preacber. 

1b. TIM. Ik., '97, 



96 



INT^R-CoLLLGlATL 



Athletic Association 



01 


* NEW 


^IORRJS 

— ©— 


3TATC 


Hamilton, 






Rochester, 


Colgate, 






Hobart, 


Union, 






Syracuse. 



(3tI)letiC5. 



TT is not the purpose of the Hamiltonian to conceal with the superficial gloss of self- 
laudation, the defects of our college. We are forced, unwillingly and regretfully, to 
admit that the old athletic spirit of Hamilton is dwindling. That pluck and energy, 
which in times past have more than made up for our small numbers, seems no longer to 
pervade our ranks. There seems to be an opinion prevalent that the glorious past can 
not be duplicated. Such an idea is a wrong one, and, although the enthusiam is not 
strong as formerly, yet the same old determination is here, and let the opportunity present 
itself, and the same efforts will be made and the same glory w r ill be won. 

The chief cause of this retrogression is the lack of incentives. We are no longer in a 
league, and the keen spirit of inter-collegiate rivalry no longer spurs our athletes on 
during the tedious hours of training. The glory of penants to be won, and the plaudits 
of beauty gathered at the course, no longer flash before the eyes and sound in the ears of 
Olympic aspirants. Yet however strong the force of circumstances may be, it should not 
be allowed to rob us of an important feature of our college life. For many years Hamil- 
ton has gloried in the fleetness, the endurance of her athletic sons. Not once nor twice, 
have the laurels of victory crowned their brows. The atmosphere of this Old Hill seems 
to instill nerve and speed into the bodies of those who have passed their lives among these 
pines and poplars. Has this air lost its vivifying power? Is an inferior race of men 
coming to this college, from whose walls the best have hitherto gone forth ? We hope 
not ; we believe not ; we know not. This air can still inspire ; nor are we unworthy of 
our fathers. Misfortune has smitten us severely, and our spirit is weakened by the blow ; 
but thi spirit can, and will be revived. 

There is prospect of a brighter day. A dual league with our near neighbor is pro- 
posed and meets the hearty approval of all. We sincerely hope that such a union can 
be affected. It would arouse our old determination ; it would nerve our arms, and give 
wings to our feet ; and a dying department of college life would be rescusitated. If such 
a league is established, rivalry will be stimulated ; the annual day of contest will be re- 
stored, and the fame and name of Old Hamilton will be at stake ; and her sons, never 
yet found wanting in an hour of need, will rally round the Buff and Blue to raise again 
the shouts of victorv. 



4/9 



Atl)letic Union, 



HAMILTON COLLEGE. 



w 



0PFICFR3. 

Pres/V/e/jf. 

Clinton Scollard, '81. 

Vice Presidents. 
J. H. Lee, '95, J. G. Everett, '95, 

G. E. Stone, '95. 

Treasurer. 

Prof. M. G. Dodge, '90. 

Secretary. 
W. W. Chambers, '95. 

Advisory Committee. 

F. M. Calder, '82, . . . . Vi TJtiea, N. Y. 

J. R. Myers, '87, Washington, D. C. 

A. R. Kessinger, '88, Rome, N. Y. 

S. C. Brandt, '89, Binghamton, N. Y. 

T. L. Coventry, '91, Utica, N. Y. 



100 



Athletic Association 



HAMILTON COLLEGE. 



© 



officers. 

J. H. Lee, '95. President, 

F. E. VanWie, '96, Secretary and Treasurer 

J. W. Carmalt, '95, Inter-collegiate Diretor. 

B. H. Thrope, '95, Senior Director. 

G. W. Wood, '96, Junior Director. 

A. R. Ehman, '97, Sophomore Director. 

B. E. Turnbull, '98, Freshman Director. 



101 



Records of tl)e Nev ^Iorl^ estate 



INTER-COLLEGIATE 



Athletic Association, 



AT SYRACUSE, N. Y., 



MAY 30, 1894. 



Hundred Yards Dash, . 



M. Fikes, '95, Syracuse, 11 sec. 
G. W. Hoyt, '93, Syracuse. 
O. Root, Jr., '94, Hamilton. 



Putting 16-Pound Shot, 



1. Ford, Colgate, 36 ft. 6 in. 

2. A. E. Barnes, '95, Union. 

3. P. A. Monroe, '95, Colgate. 



Pole Vault, 



u 



L. S. McCltntock, 97, Union. 
D. H. Naylor, '94, Hamilton. 
G. W. Hoyt, '93, Syracuse. 



440 Yards Dash, 



M. Fikes, '95, Syracuse, 54 sec. 
C. H. Kilpatrick, '97, Union. 
L. F. O'Neil, '97, Union. 



Mile Walk, 



1. Kraus, '97, Syracuse, 10 min. 2 sec. 

2. G. E. Pollock, '96, Union. 

3. W. S. McEwan, Union. 



120 Yards Hurdle 



(1. F. E. Holleran, '95, Union, 20 4-5 sec. 
\ 2. M. A. Twilford, '96, Union. 
( 1. A. W. Risley, '94, Colgate. 



880 Yards Dash, 



fl. C. H. Kilpateick, '97, Union, 2 min. 18J sec. 
< 2. L. F. Ostrander, '94, Hamilton. 
I 3. W. Allen, '95, Union. 



102 



Running Broad Jump, 



Running High Jump, 



Two Mile Bicycle Race, 



One Mile Run, 



Throwing 16-Pound Hammer, 



220 Yards Hurdle, . . 



220 Yards Dash, 



1. L. M. Scofield, '96, Union, 20 ft. 6 1-2 in. 

i. 
ite. 



(1. L. M. Scofield, '96, Uni 

. . \ 2. J. L. Myers, ".Hi, Union. 

(.3. G. A. Briggs, '94, Colgal 

r 1. B. O. Burgin, '95, Union, 5 ft. 

. . \ 2. L. H. Shepperd, '95, Syracuse 

U. J. H. Schaefer, '97, Syracuse. 

{1. C. F. Feek, '95, Syracuse, 15 i 

2. 0. C. Brown, '96, Syracuse. 

3. B. Burtis, '97, Union. 



C 1. C. H. Kilpatrick, H .)7 Union, 5min. 351 sec. 



F. R. Burke, Hamilton. 
F. Z. Dervis, '69, Syracuse. 



1. II. E. Newell, '95, Colgate, 85 ft. 11 in. 
Union. 
Union. 



(1. II. E. Newell, '95, 

\ 2. Z. L. Myers, '96, I 

( 3. A. E. Barnes, '95, 

(1. M. A. Twilford, '96, U 

\ 2. F. E. Holler an, '95, Ui 

1 3. E. S. Warren, '96, Syra 



1. M. A. Twilford, '96, Union, 28 4-5 sec. 
nion. 
-acuse. 



1. M. Fikes, '95, Syracuse, 24 1-5 sec. 

2. O. Root, Jr., Hamilton. 

3. VanDuzen, Union. 



SUMMARY. 



UNION, 59 points. 

SYRACUSE, 38 "■ 



HAMILTON, 
COLGATE, . 



13 points. 
13 " 



103 




L 



5opI)omore Athletic Team. 



CHAMPIONS FALL FIELD DAY. 



J. M. GLASS, Manager. 

A. R. EHMAN, Captain. 



A. P. Ames, 
H. T. Beardsley, 
H. H. Bogue, 
F. R. Burke, 
A. R. Ehman, 
W. H. Hopkins, 



B. R. Johnson, 

C. A. Johnson, 

R. D. McGregor. 
J. E. Sweet, 

J. B. TlTRNBULL, 

I. D. Williams. 



105 



Tim INTmi-CoLI^CHATB 



Foot Ball Association 



NEW <IORFj 3T(JTE. 



Members. 

Hamilton College, 

Syracuse University, 

Union University, 

Rochester University. 



IDS 



Foot Bait. 



— ©— 

n COLLEGE is always proud to praise a laurel- winning team. We now sound the 
praises of a team that failed last Fall to cross the enemy's goal line even once Yet 
no Ha.miltonian ever presented to its perusers a group of men more worthy of 
praise than the heroes on the following page. Heroes they are, for can one less than 
a hero struggle persistently against adversity. They failed, hut their failure was one which 
crowned them with wreaths brighter than ever adorned the brows of Olympic victors. 
We praise them because they stood by our standard to the end. Defeats discouraged, 
but did not dishearten; the loss of their captain was a severe blow; but loyalty to our 
dear old college held them firm. Thwarted ambition and conceited pride caused the con- 
temptible desertion of men able and justly expected to fight for Hamilton, but men less 
able but more honorable, stepped into the traitor-opened breach. All honor to the men 
who were loyal through all disasters; let the names of deserters be cast into a deserved 
oblivion. 

We wear new colors this year, and Fortune has baptized them with the bitter tears 
of failure. This is not the first time these colors have been worn under the dark cloud of 
adversity. They were driven from Bunker Hill defeated, and they stood on the ram- 
parts of Yorktown, triumphant. We have fought our Bunker Hill: our Yorktown is 
coming. 

To no one thing or person can our disastrous career of '94 be attributed. Many 
things conspired together to bring about the result. Even before the season had fairly 
begun, men were injured; some so badly that they were useless for weeks. The captain 
was one of those unfortunates, and the team was compelled to continue its work with a 
crippled captain. The acceptance of his tendered resignation was refused, as his recovery 
was constantly hoped for. Some of the most skillful, but at the same time the most 
unscrupulous men, deserted the cause. The majority of the players were new and inex- 
perienced. When we consider all these facts we ought not to despair, but rather take 
hope for the future. 

Now, the all-important question is, what are the prospects for next year? "Forget- 
ting the things that are behind, let us press forward." Nearly all who played last year 
will return next fall with a grim determination to be revenged. The men who were 
novices have been schooled by that sternest of instructors, experience. A painful lesson 
has impressed upon all the necessity of hard, conscientious work; and the need of active 
participation by every under-graduate has been woefully emphasized. An energetic 
manager is already at work. He should have the hearty cooperation of every man in 
college. We long for the chance to show the world that Hamilton can rise from crushing 
defeat and smite as hard as she has been smitten. 

Let Autumn come, and the falling leaves will cover the graves of our enemies. You 
sons of Hamilton who are now called to stand in the fight, be loyal, be hopeful, and 
work; and when the last "down" shall have been whistled for the season of '95, the 
"Blue and Buff " will fly triumphant, and graduates and under-gradnates, together with all 
the friends of Hamilton, joining in one mighty chorus of commendation will cry, " Well 
done!" 

L09 



Hgmi/roN Coleege 

Fgd! P>ciU Association. 



Manager, Geo. E. Stone, '9-5. 

Inter-collegiate Director, R. B. Dudley, '95. 

Senior Director, W. A. Aiken, '95. 

Junior Director, W. T. Moore, '96. 

Sophomore Director, A. L. Kessler, '97. 

Freshman Director, C. J. France, '98. 



COLLEGE TEAM. 

Captain, - - - - C. S. Wright, '95. 

Gen-.— Thokp, '95. 

R. G.— Thomas, '96. L. G.— Darling, '97. 

R. .T— Warp, '96. L. T.— Wright,— Payne. 

R. E.— Finn, '98. X. £.— Burke, '97. 

Q.— Towner, '96. 

JR. XT.— Weber, '98. Z. if.— Burt, '95,— Williams, '97. 

i" 1 . — Aiken, '95, — Greenwood, '95. 



Substitutes. 

Moore, '96; C. A. Johnson, '97; DeFrank, '98. 

Ill 



Pressman P®t Ball Team. 



CLASS OF '98. 



C. (J. Cunningham, - Manager. 

C. J. France, Captain. 









TEAM. 








Cen 


.— Roci 


DRS. 


R. 


G. — Finn. 






L. 67. — Stone. 


R. 


T.— Wade. 




r 


L. 7 7 .— Searle. 


R. 


E. — Allen. 






L. E. — COOKINHAM 


F, 


— France. 






Q. — Kelsey. 


R. 


H. — Weber. 






L. H.— DeFrank. 



Substitute. 

Noble. 



113 



Pressman F>&se BciU Team. 



CLASS OF 1898. 



J. R. Babcock, 



L. K. Stevens, 



L. K. Stevens, c. 
J. H. Buel, p. 
E. J. Noble, i/>. 
H. r, Weber, 2b. 



Manager. 
Captain. 
P. A. Rose, 3b. 

R. S. COOKINHAM. S 

A. J. Dewey, /. /. 
C. J. France, c. /'. 



R. G. Kelsey, r. f. 



Substitute. 

S. L. Butler. 



i i 



Hamilton College P>ase F)&U Team 



1595. 



OFFICERS. 






John G. Everett, '95, 


Manager, 




George H. Geer, '95, 


Captain. 




Percy A. Rose, '97, 


Field Captain. 




TEAM. 






L. K. Stevens, '98, c. P. A. 


Rose. '97, 56. 




J. H. Bi el, '98, p. F. R. 


Burke, '1)7, s. s. 




E. J. Noble, '98, i/>. E. A. 


Rogers, '98, If 




G. H. Geer, '95, 2b. A. N. 


Petersen, '95, c. f 




W. A. Aiken, '95, r, /. 






Substitutes. 


• 




C. A. Johnson, '97. 


A. J. Dewey, 


'98. 


R. S. Cookinham, '98. 


C. J. France, 


'98. 



116 








1 




^Iocing Men's Christian (lSS oc ^ ion 



OFFICERS. 



Presidt nt : 



\ r lc( -President, 



\W. T. Moore, '96. 



F. E. VanWie, '96. 



f 'or responding Secretary, 



I). A. Davy, '97. 



Treasurer. 



B. R. Johnson, '97. 



R( cording Secretary, 



S. L. Butler, '98. 



us 



». J> <*~~L ~r~~ i \ J>\ K. A ■'- 




aw 






mm 



SmII 



H$ lb 



Tl)e College CDotr. 



M. Woolsey Stryker, Leader. 
J. Herbert MacConnell, Organist. 



First Tenor. 

Forest Rose, 
W. H. Hopkins, 
A. D. Scovel. 



Second Tenor. 

Alexander Alison, Jr. 
B. M. Balch, 
W. E. Hewitt, 
H. B. Ward. 



First Bass. 

W. L. Allen, 
R. G. MacGregor. 
E. J. Noble, 
I. D. Williams. 

Second Bass. 

H. K. Booth, 
G. H. Geer, 
P. A. Rose, 
R. B. Searle, 
C. W. Wright. 



119 




Prof. A. I). Morrill, A. M., M. 8., 



Instructor 



Members of the Class. 



Roy I). Dudley, 
J. Arden Ferguson, 
Oscar A. Knox, 



J. Irwin Frarce, 

Frank P. Knowlton, 
Byron B. Taggart, Jr. 



(J. Weeks Wood. 



honorary Members. 

Alfred L. Kessler, Thos. C. Gifford. 



Links Discovered and Classified. 



"Sully" the Aborignal, 

( rRINNING CLARK, 

Freak Miller, 
Ring-Tailed Minor, 
Howling-Mon k i-: v Loomis, 
"Zelote" the Grimacing Mycetes, 



Darwin Congdon, 
Chimpanzie Laird, 
Chattering Babtist, 
Baboon Babcook, 
Cocoanut Frost. 









TI)e Dramatic Ctab's Trips in 'yl, 



0YR predecessor has painted the brilliant success of the first appearance of the Ham- 
ilton Dramatic Clnb for the season of '94. It remains for us to give our readers 
some faint conception of those other "nights off." The Dramatic Club with its 
hangers-on started on a certain afternoon of a certain month, in the year of grace 
1894, to show the collegians up the valley what a good club could do. They showed 
them; and they were shown in turn what the " gallery gods " of the neighboring me- 
tropolis could do. 

About the end of the second act the trouble began. " Such hollering, whistling and 
cat calls I never heard in my life before." Leander Medoug resolutely strove to stop the 
loud applause, but for the want of proper placards his efforts were unavailing. 

Before the close of the third act the Professor and Mrs. Marshall had succumbed, 
and longed for the end of the fourth act and the peace and quiet of the Park House. 
It was in the middle of this act that Ada took cold. Her voice weakened, and despite 
both hot and cold applications, within and without, she traveled up and down the scale 
with an unsteady stride. 

Ernest was depressed. He was heavily in debt; for he had found a generous friend 
in the party who had money to burn and a penny to lend. His mind wandered from 
his special cl large and Louise had to go without her full share of devotion that night. 
Louise felt slighted and injured; and though she strove with all the ardor of her affec- 
tionate nature to extract those tender tones from her lover, they would not come. 

Mr. Harwood endeavored to enthuse a little life into the last act, but was repressed by 
the Professor, who, drawing himself to his full height, uttered words that would never 
have escaped his— prototype. Nora alone remained placid. She had forwarded no 
money to the management and therefore had no reason to be perturbed by the dearth of 
auditors. 

Words can never describe the scene at the house upon the park. The wickedness of 
that town of Hamilton would tax the vituperative imagination of two Clinton Couriers 
to express. In vain did the troupe try to keep those wicked people from over stimulat- 
ing themselves. In vain did they reason and expostulate with them and even threaten. 
A few of the men were decoyed into the dens of the genii of the place (known as Colga- 
tians i and witnessed scenes over which it is best we should draw the veil of secrecy. 

In the rush to catch the train some one inadvertently tripped over a hanging lamp, 
thereby doing damage to a valuable table, on which is played some kind of a ball game. 
It was a sorry mischance; for the depleted treasury could stand no more drains. Mis- 
fortune seemed to follow on our trail. JSot only were we compelled to bear the blame of 
the awful orgies of that night, but the proprietor of the hostelry demanded settlement 
from our management for his injured table. "Too bad! " " Too bad! " 

Chagrinned, but not disheartened, the club made its appearance the next week in the 
booming little town of Frankfort. They were not met at the depot by "the band," but 
the warmth of their reception at the handsomely furnished opera house was very remark- 
able. Throughout tin- play the enthusiasm of that throng of thirty-two people (including 
-: the band " ) was unbounded; With drooping colors and a very light purse the Dramatic 
Club, accompanied by its still faithful heelers, returned to Clinton. 

<>})'. the glories of the foot-lights! Oh! the splendors of the green room! Many 
times before have these fancies been dispelled. Once again has Hamilton's Dramatic 
Club learned the utter fallacy of these glowing contemplations. 

122 



Hamilton College Dramatic Clcrb. 



-a night orr. 



Business Manager, - George A. Watrous. 

Stage Manager, - Willis N. Mills. 

Professor Marshall, James W. Carmalt. 

Leander Mcdong, Willis N. Mills. 

Mr. Harward, of New York, II. Roswell Bates. 

Ernest Harward, '..-.: Arthur D. Scovel. 

Dr. Harold Watson, Cornelius T. Gibson. 

Mrs. Marshall, George A. Watrous. 

Louise Marshall, Neile F. Towner. 

Mrs. Ada Watson, . ' Clarence A. Fetterly. 

Nora, Daniel W. Burke. 

Time, - Any Time. 

Place, - - Anywhere. 

-©— 

Act I.— The Serpent Enters the Garden. " The Beautiful Helena." 

Act EI. — The Conspiracy. The Plot Thickens. 

Act III.— All Have a Night Off. 

Act IV. — "Turn My Picture to the Wall." Turn it Back Again. 

124 



So 
C/ 



ft- 




Glee and P>anjo Ctab. 



SEASON 1894=95. 



I. J. Greenwood, '95, 
George H. Geer, '95, 



Manager, 



(Mn clu§. 



J. Herbert MacConnell, 

First Tenor. 
J. Herbert MacConnell, '95, 
Arthur D. Scoyel, '96. 

Second Tenor. 
Burton M. Balch, '95, 
William E. Hewitt, '96. 

Prof. Alexander Thompson, 



Leader. 

First Bass. 
Horace T. Owen, '95, 
Irving D. Williams, '97. 

Second Box*. 
Clarence S. AVrigiit, '95, 
Robert G. MacGregoij, '9/ 

Instructor. 



>. 



m^jo cuib 



Alexander Alison, Jr., 
Banjo. 
Alexander Alison, Jr, '96, 
Byron B. Taggart, Jr., '96, 
William L. Allen, '98, 
John H. Holmes, '98, 
Edward N. Reed, '98, 
Geo. H. Robbins, '98, 
Byron E. Turnbull, '98. 

Violoncello. 
< teo. E. Stone, '95. 

Prof. F. K. Briggs, 



Leader. 

Guitar. 
George H. Geer, '95, 
Charles A. Green, '96, 
Harry B. Wood, '96, 
Albertie DeFrank, '98, 
Eugene R. Smith, '98. 

Mandolin. 
J. Robert Babcock, '98. 



Instructor. 



1 26 




.,: 



HOUSTON Col^EGE 

Glee and Banjo Club's Concert. 



w 



PROGRAiWE. 

part 1T. 



1. ONEIDA-HAMILTON, 

Glee and Banjo Clubs. 

2. SILVER WAVE SCHOTTISCHE, Kimball. 

Banjo Club. 

:5. WE MEET AGAIN TO-NIGHT, Sitae*. 

Glee Club. 

4. BANJOURIM SOLO, Selected. 

Me. Briggs. 

5. REMEMBRANCES OF HAMILTON, Briggs. 

Banjo Club, 

(i. TOM, THE PIPER'S SON, F. A. Kendall. 

Glee Club. 



part It. 

1. WIEN BLEIBT WIEN, an. Briggs. 

Banjo Club. 

2. THE OWL AND THE PUSSY CAT, DeKoven. 

Glee Club. 

3. BANJO SOLO— CRUSADERS' GALLOP, Glynn. 

Mr. Briggs. 

4. LIBERTY BELL, Sousa. 

Banjo Club. 

->. MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP, H. P. Harrington. 

Glee Club. 

6. CHEER, BOYS, CHEER, Stack. 

Glee and Banjo Clubs, 

128 




Ctt^fcv' 1 * Arw 



7 



Original Arm^. 



p. w 



Camp Soubriquet. 

J. S. Coxey, T. 

Carl Brown, . . A-k-n . 

Legal Tender, Ev-r-tl 

Unknown Smith, Al-s-n 

Don't-give-a-damn Jo.n,:; C-rm-lt 



Commission. 

d* To rake in Funds. 

... To toast Houghton Seniors. 

To start the Yell. 

Toots the horn. 

To rush the growler. 



Dusty Dolittle, 



. Ow-n . . Advance Agent. 



1\AW RECRUIT^. 

Bagnees the Roadster, Fr- 

Left-over Jackson, G- 



nc 
-r 



Pilot of the Schooners. 
. . Solicitor General t 



Fitz- Willi am Bloobitm e^.:, 

Ragged Haggard, 

Frayed Idler, . . 

Hairy Joblots, 

Paradise Lost, .... 

Paradise Regained, 

Tired Tolliver, 

Wandering Willy, H-w-tt 

Sandwich McClosky, . . . . Kn-x . 



— 11. . : Laundry man. 

Wr-gln . . . . Chief- Justice of the bar. | 

M-ll-r . Choral Leader. 

C--k-nh-,ii Nurse to Legal Tender. 

D-1-F1-- -r Chaplain. 

Gr — n Assistant to Hairy Joblots. 

W-rd . . . Custodian of the pots and kettles. 

.... Coach in social functions. 

Color bearer. 



ON PHOPjfTTlOtf 



Onnis Asa 



*departed. 

fdrinks. 
JMahaney's. 



h£ndE£vou>s. 

J. Mahaney's. 



1-20 




I <OTt 









Tf)e Tennis Association 



MAAIIvTON Col5l5^C 



OFFICERS. 



A. N. Petersen, '95, 
F. P. Warfield, '96, 
M. C. Loomis, '95, 

B. B. Taggart, Jr., '90, 
F. R. Burke, '97, 



President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Senior Director. 
Junior Director. 
Sophomore Director. 



i::i 





u 



W\ if 




'5>6 Class Wi)ist Club. 



President, 

Treasurer, 



Byron Brown T ago art, Jr. 
J. Arden Ferguson. 



MEMBERS. 



Thomas Upson Chesebrough, 
Frederic Parkman Warfield. 



A. J. <P. 
Frank Wing Holmes, 
George Lewis Lerch. 



w. r. 

Byron Brown Taggart, Jr., 
Louis K. R. Laird. 



Neile Fassett Towner, 
J. Arden Ferguson, 
Charles Archibald Green. 



J. r. 
William Throop Moore, 
Harry Barnes Ward. 

0. A. X. 
Oscar Albert Knox. 



J. A. E. 

Alexander Alison, Jr.. 
Gardner Weeks Wood. 

E. L. S. 
Seth Newland Thomas, 
Hiram David Bacon. 



18:-; 







U\j 



Mare and Motmds Ctal). 



C. A. FROST Whipper-in, 



Ely Buell, 



MARB3. 



Benjamtn H. Thorp 



HOIIND3 



Allan P. Ames, 
George Anderson, 
Horace H. Bogue, 
Fred R. Burke, 
Wm. B. Carver, 
Carl G. Cunningham. 
Alfred R. Ehman, 
D. W. Congdon, 



Winthrop H. Hopkins, 
Benjamin R. Johnson, 
Ralph S. Minor, 
Edward N. Reed, 
Edward A. Rogers, 
James B. Turnbull, 
James A. Winans. 



134 




^ ^ 



^h^z^^ 



^eut, ^$etG unb $efan§'$efe1Xffyaft 



JUNIOR 30Ci^T^i. 



ESTABLISHED 1895. 



Colors — Claret, Amber and Champagne Yellow. 
Yell — Socadamouche, Socadamouche, 

SOCADAMOUCHE, — YlER BlATTS. 

His Most Supreme and Capacious Sacadamouche. 

B. B. Taggart, Jr. 

Custodian of the Keg and Bailiff of the Bottles. 

Oscar A. Knox. 

Gatherer of the Hens. 

H. J. Cookinham, Jr. 

Most High Schreecher. 

Arthur I). Scovel. 



Most Efficient Members. 



Alexander Alison, Jr., 
Hiram D. Bacon, 
J. Arden Ferguson, 
Charles A. Green, 
William E. Hewitt, 



Frank W. Holmes, 
Louis K. R. Laird, 
Setii N. Thomas, 
Harry B. Ward, 
G. Weeks Wood. 



135 




Clinton d)igvam 



T AAA AN *I TRI§E. 



SAGAMORES. 

H. C. G. Brandt, ( u Man-proud-of-his-own-thunder") . . . Grand Sachem. 

W. H. Squires, ( "Snake-in-the-grass" ) Pow Wow. 

A. G. Hopkins, (" He- who-combs-his- whiskers") . . Curator of the Tom Tom. 
C. H. Smyth, ("Young-man-afraid-of-his-shadow") .... Medicine Man. 
Pete Kelly, ("Roaring-Bull") Orator. 



BRAVES. 



H. B. Ward, 
W. E. Hewitt, 



W. A. Aiken, 
H. R. Burgess, 



N. F. Towner. 



♦Indian name translated, "Young-man-dead-stuck-on-himself." 



131 



Contentment. 



H pipe, a book, a prettv? girl; 

©f Qoob oR> wine an ample casfe ; 
IReliet from care ant) bus$ wbirl ; 

Us all tbat anp man can ask. 



137 



College PaMtcations 



HAAILTONIAN 



'96 BOARD. 



Business Manager and Editor=in=Chief. 

Thomas Upson Chesebrough. 



Literary Editor. 



Byron Brown Taggart, Jr. 



Art Editor. 

George Lewis Lerch. 



Advertising Agent. 

Alexander Alison, Jr. 



Secretary. 

William Throop Moore. 

— Q— 

John Arden Ferguson. Oscar Albert Knox. 



18<> 



Hamilton loiter ar^ ^VontI)l^. 



Burton M. Balch, - - - Business Manager. 

I. J. Greenwood, - - - Editor-in-chief. 

Literary Editors. Exchange Editors. 

John G. Everett, John H. Lee, 

Seth N. Thomas. Arthur T. Warner. 

Local Editors. 

Louis K. R. Laird, 
William E. Hewitt. 



Hamilton Review. 



PUNISHED L^I THE EJ1ER50N LITER A1UI 50CIETq. 



Carl A. Babtist, Manager. 

Editors. 

Thomas G. Burt, Roy B. Dudley, 

Edward S. Babcock, Millard C. Loomis 

Burr Gould Eells, Edwin B. Bobbins. 



140 




^CIEAJC 



Science at Hamilton. 



rOR a long time, Hamilton, like many other colleges, gave but little attention to 
Science. Boasting herself as a distinctly classical college, and offering but one 
course, rigorously mapped out, and allowing no opportunity for option or election, 
she considered it all-important to give the student a grievously thorough training in 
mathematics and the classics. Sciences were secondary and of little importance. An 
extremely fragmentary knowledge of Physics, Chemistry, and Astronomy, made up about 
all of that branch of learning that was considered necessary and fitting for a college edu- 
cation. 

Other colleges, to keep pace with the increased information in regard to Science, and 
the enlarged demand for physical proficiency, introduced the elective system and en- 
larged and strengthened their scientific departments; but Hamilton, relying on her repu- 
tation as the "Home of Oratory," still kept to her iron-clad, non-scientific classical 
course. 

With the addition of the Latin Scientific Course and the introduction of the elective 
system a change has been made. All the departments of physical science were, of neces- 
sity, strengthened throughout. Geology and Mineralogy were united under one chair. 
The course in Physics was extended and a laboratory equipped. In 1891, a department 
of Biology was added to the chair of Chemistry, and this department has steadily grown 
until it has become one of the most popular courses in our scientific curriculum. The 
course now covers two years and includes Anatomy, Physiology, Histology, and Emby- 
ology. During the present year, a class in Comparative Osteology has been added; and 
a1 each recitation " Old John " (the skeleton) steps forth from his closet to terrify the 
student with condyles, processes, and foramina. 

Hamilton College is not a university, and does not pretend to offer opportunities for 
post-graduate work in Science. Even if it were desired, the plan would be impracticable. 
The laboratories are small, though fairly well-equipped for under-graduate work. If the 
rapid advance which has taken place during the last few years is continued, Hamilton 
will soon have scientific advantages not to be excelled by any institutions except the 
large universities. 

The gr< -at need at the present is endowments, not only to further equip the labora- 
tories, but also to enlarge the accommodations and the corps of instructors. 



142 



Ifn flfoemoriam. 



5obn 1benn? /IDvers, Jr., a. j. <i> 



OF THE CLASS OF 1895. 



36ovn at /IDobawfe, 3anuar^ 19, 1869. SHcfc at flDobawft, 3uh? 13, 1894. 



fl>rot Jobn William ©'Brten, XX. B. t v. r., 



OF THE CLASS OF 1873. 



36orn at Huburn, ©ctobcr 13, 1853. Diet* at Bubuvn, /Ibavj 5, 1895. 



J 43 




JOHN W. O'BRIEN. 



3obn William ©'Brien, R fll>., %%. B. 

OUR record of the college year now closing, opens to make room for 
words that however warm and earnest must seem poor to all who knew 
and loved this manly soul. On Sunday evening, May 5th, the sharp 
message came that John O'Brien was dead. For the first time the college 
flag was swung at half-mast. On the quiet sunset air the chapel bell gave 
out its heavy monotone of forty-two strokes. Such a, few days before, and 
he was here in all fulness of activity, and now — It is not given to many to 
make friends so rapidly and so naturally. His work as Lecturer in Munici- 
pal Law was only a transient supply in the temporary absence of Professor 
Delos Smyth; but the brief fifteen weeks of that work sufficed to endear Mr. 
O'Brien in a peculiar way to all who had met him here. Very briefly we 
trace the outline that after all can convey so little to any who did not know 
him and that must read so meagerly to the many groups where he was so 
deeply loved. In Auburn, Oct. 13, 1858, he was born, and from the High 
School there in 1869, he entered Hamilton with the class of '73. In that ex- 
ceptionally stalwart class he took: a place of marked honor. He was a clear 
writer, a thrilling speaker, and a strong Grecian. Nowhere was he far behind 
the very leaders. Everyone loved him. His circle of college friendships 
was unusually large and his generous heart lived quite above all petty and 
clannish exclusiveness. 

Better yet, everyone believed in him. His personal honor and his firm 
Christian fidelity were as absolute as they were modest. The»tributes of Dr. 
Hoyt, both at his funeral service and at the memorial service of the follow- 
ing Sunday in the College Chapel, and the tender words of Arthur Jones of 
'73, were felt to be representative of the thoughts of all the college men of 
O'Brien's time. Not often are men found to utter such heartfelt tributes and 
out of such full personal knowledge, seldomer still are any worthy of so 
much. 

After graduation John O'Brien taught for two years as Principal of the 
Griffith Institute of Springville, N. Y. , and afterward as instructor in math- 

145 



ematics and history in the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. He graduated as 
LL. B., from the Columbia School in 1878. For two years he practiced Law 
in Leadville, Colo., and became prosecuting attorney of its county. Two 
years more he practiced in Denver, and then returning to Auburn, he entered 
into a partnership, which continued to his death, with the Hon. Sereno E. 
Payne, M. C. As city attorney, president of the Board of Education, an ac- 
tive worker in the Y. M. C. A., the superintendent of the First Baptist Church 
Sunday School, an ardent member of the Cayuga Historical Society, and as 
an especially useful member of the Constitutional Convention of 1894, Mr. 
O'Brien showed his versatile and comprehensive acquirements and powers. 

Those now in college will well remember his enthusiastic and inspiriting 
lecture in the chapel a year since upon the Profession of the Law, and which 
appeared in full in the Lit. of March '94. His work in the class room through 
the second term of this year, continued into the third term and until his ill- 
ness, was a delight to all his section in Municipal Law, and made it no sur- 
prise to us to learn that he had been earnestly considered as a desirable can- 
didate for State Senator and more than mentioned for the presidency of Col- 
gate University. 

His illness was sharp and short — peritonitis. He died bravely. Seldom 
is a whole city so profoundly moved as Auburn was over the anouncement of 
his death. It had know him boy and man and known naught of him that 
was not noble and strong. Far and wide the scattered groups of those who 
had loved him grieved over an end that seemed so abrupt and premature. 
Such a life is genial and cogent beyond all describing. It was faithful in all 
things and the variety of-his friendships was as notable as the recollection of 
his winning and eager manhood is durable and tender 

His funeral was coincident with the opening of the Psi Upsilon Conven- 
tion, which this year met with the Hamilton Chapter. He was an honored 
member of that order and had been prominent in assisting the plans for this 
meeting. In his place, alas ! there was only the shadow of a great absence. 
Noble, loyal, remembered, he will live on. His was a character whose diffusive 
influence we cannot measure. '78 will always mourn its faithful class secre- 
ta rv. 1 1 ai nilton has one more bright star in her constellation of honor. Hail, 
dear friend, and farewell. 

" Love is and was my Lord and King, 
And in his presence I attend 
To hear the tidings of my friend 
Which every hour his couriers bring, 

And hear at times a sentinel 

Who moves about from place to place 

And whispers to the worlds of space, 
In the deep night, that all is well." 

140 



1 wo Influences Peculiar to flamUfon, 



HE young man of to-day is what the old man of to-day was yesterday. The romp- 
ing days of youth, of which the poet sings, do not point to childhood but to those 
years when youth is teeming with life, fired with enthusiasm, crowded with con- 
flicting thoughts, and jealous of his own opinions. Those are the years when the 
young man enters college. 

In the city there is the constant friction of classes. The young man is sympathetic 
and his mind is alert. He looks down this alley, walks past that palace, glances across 
the field of buildings with their smoking factories, surging poor, and towering tenement 
houses. The massive cathedral and gilded dome, the magnificent music and splendid ritual 
lose their influence upon him. He reads the life of the people as reflected in the 
columns of crime and distress recorded in the newspaper, and then he thinks! and his 
thoughts distort Browning's words till he exclaims, " God's in his heaven, all's wrong 
with the world." 

Thus the city youth is apt to become pessimistic, and in a city college his pessimism 
only finds food for such reflection. Let the young man come from the city to live four 
years at our rural college. He wanders through nature's garden and watches the growing of 
the trees, the habits of birds, he breathes the clear air and perceives God's care as he sees 
the re-creation of the spring, the ripening of the summer days, the harvests of autumn, 
and witnesses nature cradled to rest as the Creator gently weaves the snow flakes into a 
blanket of warmth that the spring may have life more abundant. Though dark foreboding 
thoughts may have troubled the student, and skepticism may have sought a foothold, he 
instinctively cries out, " God's in his world, all will be well with his people! " 

Perhaps this is an exaggerated picture of the effect of the magnificent scenes of 
woodlands and meadows with Which the student at Hamilton is surrounded; but it is true 
that the harmony of the country must have a wonderful influence, strengthening, devel- 
oping and inspiring youth's emotions. The young man stands on the crest of Hamilton 
and views the valley. He sees the city as a speck in the foliage, while stretching away to 
the right, to the left, to the north, to the south, is the pasture of the people laden with 
produce for the table. His thoughts come quick and fast; admiration, a belief in the 
miraculous, a realization of the beautiful — visions which educate every great life — spontane- 
ously come to him. 

There is another influence at Hamilton College, quite as potent and quite as 
peculiar to itself as the esthetic influence just mentioned. Everything at Ham- 
ilton College tends to good citizenship. The College has grown with the building of 
the nation. Its very name inspires thoughts of true statesmanship. The valley as well 
as; the town, which it overlooks, bear historical names. The national flag is unfurled 
above its campus, and in memory of the days of the nation's birth it has adopted the 
colors of the nation's first army. 

The student may be dwarfed with much study, his moral life tainted by the evil 
and vices which besiege all student-life, but he cannot live four years at a college situated 
in a veritable garden of Eden, and embedded in patriotic thought, without becoming a 
broader man, a stronger optimist and a better citizen. 

148 




Optd in tl)e Conservatory. 



(WINTER. 




HAT'S become of Cupid now 

That the river reaches harden, 
And no verdure shields the hough 
Of the rose-tree in the garden ? 



O he's safe — the waggish trot ! 

For he's found (so runs the story !) 
A most captivating spot 

In Marie's conservatory. 

Roses bloom in richness there ; 

There are thorns to tip his darts with, 
And a fragrance in the air 

Very fine for luring hearts with. 

Marie's heart alone he spares ; 

(Seems to me he's very stupid !) 
The most pressing of my cares 

Is to find a bribe for Cupid. 



149 



Tf)e Poplars. 




sett erotics from 



;u me 



xransplanted to this Land cr snow and nm( 

-* O ■> 1 ""!""? v " v "' '"» •>>^'^ r-/~ •. -^ ^ /} *v o — r- -> ^ ^ ^>"i ?i iyi 

— o o 

~~ • n 1 1 i t 1 i i 

~ -J o 



P ] P eS CT ~~ r " 



>uracusan s not; 



snepnera s t arc at 



INo fervent praises from ; 

:onali crown trm prace. _ ; c sett Italian dome 

©f melting asure be thu branches 5 heme. 

o -J 

AALhen blushing morn illumes the Jbastern jailL, 
The iewey air no trembling thrush* notes fill; 
^ [z even when the sun sinks e'er the lea 



[% 



.we snep nerds in thu shade recu 



I IC 



• Ind try their am< 



rienaiy oout their wme 

lis measures while their flocfc 



-ontent 



jimonp tne r.zrzz, and rocICi 



hat 



here? Tne ragged fir and pine 



•^nd spruce and hemlock never knew the INme ! 



3U. rearec 



Lands z'\ Love ant. melody. 



B. Dye. B. 



150 



Oar Geology Trip. 

_©_ 

SPRING had come again with its many changes. Among these changes were the 
great and glorious revival of a base ball team, the sudden renaisance of Squires' 
unlogical logic and very unpedagogical pedagogics ; the only original and genuine 
holiday taken by the under-graduates ; and the awful appearance of Pills sans 
beard, sans side-burns, sans Hoboken Willies, sans everything but a 'tasch. 

But there was one change before which all others paled away. The geology class 
took tramps ; not simple jaunts either, but all-day, forty-mile, fast-gallop, perspiration- 
starting walks, which gave Owen and France that tired feeling, and which reduced Clark's 
obesity 33^ %. And this is to be the story of their most celebrated trip. 

Our geology class probably represented the keenest intellects of the college. Clark, 
Owen, Buell, De La Fleur, Palmer, Burgess, France and Stone ; not one but could tell 
you what a mountain is made of or just how long a man can cut recitations and not re- 
ceive a warning. 

To Prof. Smyth the honor of the plan is due. One day in recitation he informed the 
class that he had made a discovery, a really remarkable discovery. There was a stream 
near by, easy walking distance away, which was petritied. Everything about it was pet- 
rified ; the very stones over which it rippled lay in petrified stolidity in its path ; petrified 
moss covered its border, petrified trees cast their shade over it. The birds of the neigh- 
borhood built petrified nests in those trees, and laid petrifi >d eggs therein. Petrified fishes 
could be seen swimming in the stream, and petrified water-spiders basked in the petrified 
sunlight. In short, it was one grand conglomeration of petrification and a quite original 
geological phenomenon. As Professor of Geology he would leave it to the class whether 
they would take this in on their next walk or not. 

There was a moment of petrified silence. Then all began speaking at once. " Hub " 
asked if it was anywhere near Waterville. France, with a muffled horse-laugh, muttered 
something about its being pretty steep. Owen in his sleep shifted over to the other side 
uncomfortably. Clark said, with a resigned air, that he was willing. De La Fleur, who 
was dying to get out of class, said he guessed he'd go. Ely proposed that they take it in 
as a hare and hounds trip, and asked if the rabbits there were petrified ; if so he would 
take along his gun. George Stone favored chartering a special train for any more geology 
trips. As for Sammy Palmer, he only smiled and thought of Senior vacation. 

And so it was settled, and at last the eventful day of May came, bright, cloudless, 
hot, — ye gods what a heat those geology days seemed to have ! — and withal perfect 
weather for a stroll. At two sharp the class started, bag on back, hammer in hand, brisk, 
determined, joyous. Harry Smyth held his head high in air, and seemed to promise that 
he was good for all day. Ely carried in his left hand a small bundle containing his tooth- 
brush and pajamas. Clark had forgotten his cane, but borrowed one down at Jim Car- 
malt's. Owen and France had put up a job on Sammy Palmer, so he was carrying his own 
chattels and theirs too. Burgess had not appeared; but as no one expected him, they did 

151 



not wait. " Freddy,'' However, looked his best, and so made up for two. He had on his 
stovepipe and looked like a distinguished alumnus before he strikes the Clinton House 
bar. So they put him at the head, in company with Georgie and the cane, the rest fol- 
lowing at broken intervals. 

The trip was uneventful for the first five miles, occupied mainly by personal experi- 
ences of Professor Smyth and snorts from " Frenchy" and sobs from '' H 2 O." And now 
there was but one more field to cross, and then the brook. Joyously the class scaled the 
barbed wire fence, and ploughed along at a ten mile gate. But suddenly Palmer let out 
a yell that rivalled a Comanche war-whoop, "Good Lord, look at the bull !" There he 
came like an 0. '& W. express train, head down and trailing his tail in the air. Not a 
tree in sight, and a good five hundred yards to the fence. Even Owen looked startled. 
Prof. Smyth rose to the occasion — " Scatter !" he shouted. And he didn't need to repeat 
it. Clark started for the south; Stone and Palmer veered around S. W. by AY., each 
praying that the bull might take the other man. Smyth had a scientific idea of dodging; 
so he took an easterly tack. The rest went due west as fast as they could travel. Kind 
Providence favored the expedition. "Freddie's" hat was an attraction for the bull at 
once. It had been dropped at the first 200 yards and it was not long before the bull was 
wearing it. That gave just enough handicap to allow their escape. All were safely over 
but Ely when the bull arrived. Poor fellow, in his haste he stuck in the barbed wire. 
However, it was not for long. The bull gave a snort ; there was a despairing shriek and 
a ripping sound, and Ely was safe on the other side of the fence. Safe but not unscathed. 
His wearing apparel had received severe injuries. Like Oliver Wendell Holmes, he sent 
up the cry, "My breeches, oh, my breeches." 

''Oh, our Ely, broken-hearted. 
Oh, those trousers, whole no more." 

The bull was clad in all that was left of them, a dismal souvenir of a once glorious 
spring suit, His usually beaming face was cast down and clouded with care. Suddenly 
it brightened as he thought of his pajamas. The very idea, and what a glorious chance 
for a sick excuse with Smyth's certificate for a voucher. The result of this brilliant 
scheme was the disappearance of Ely behind the nearest tree, and his sudden reappear- 
ance covered with smiles and his pajamas. 

And now to follow out the sick-idea ! He would get his certificate at once. But 
where was Harry Smyth? An anxious cry went up in each heart, " Shall we have no 
more geology lectures or trips, and will the college have another holiday ?" However, it 
was not to be. An answering shout was heard from the eastward, and by going care- 
fully around the field they found him somewhat in difficulty, but as calm as usual. He 
had struck the first strata of the day. In his endeavors to escape he had rushed head- 
long into a bog just beyond the fence. There lie was, knee-deep and quite completely 
mired. Certainly the mud thereabouts did not seem to be petrified. 

An awkard silence existed for a moment, broken only by the well known horse-laugh 
of " Frenchy." Stone had presence of mind enough to ask, "Are you hurt?" " No, only 
blamed uncomfortable," replied Harry. " How are we to get you out?" gasped Clark. 
" Fence rail," was the laconic answer. It was no sooner suggested than executed; and once 
more the profesa >r stood upon firm ground and the party was reunited. In the excitement 
of the occasion Ely had clean forgotten about the excuse, and now as lie remembered it, he 
did not think the moment a propitious one. So he did a brilliant move in the diplomatic 
line. Heedged up to Harry and said: " How was the mud, Professor? It must have been 

152 



cool. I'm sorry I can't lend you my pajamas." " D— n your pajamas," growled Smyth; 
and Ely thought it prudent to let the matter drop. 

A sadder but wiser group of geologists proceeded onward to their destination. When 
they arrived at the brook they deposited Harry on the bank to wash off the effects of the 
mud. The rest took a trip up stream for discoveries, each following out his own peculiar 
plan of action. Owen's was to seek some secluded nook, behind some big boulder, and 
indulge in that customary dolce far niente. France was not slow to follow his example. 
Ely searched anxiously for rabbits and petrified fishes. The others were more conscien- 
tious and geologized. 

Clark went at it in a beautifully systematic style. Soon he discovered a wonderful 
conical stone right on the stream's bank. He wished to carry a portion home and en- 
deavored to knock off the top. " Hully Gee ! it is a hornet's nest ! " The howl that fol- 
lowed could discount Sammy Palmer's and beat the Colgate yell in addition. Four 
hornets lit on the back of Clark's neck and started up a little investigation of their own. 
The others proceeded down the stream to try their luck in that direction. There they 
discovered two particurlarly interesting localities which they immediately appropriated. 
The one was Owen the other France. Once settled they announced their intention of 
staying, and began a lively house-warming. This was the only time on record when Owen 
was really known to have been awake, or France genuinely interested. But there seemed 
to be enough hornets to spare for the others. Talk about, bulls ! a bull isn't in it with a 
leal, live, red-hot, cussing-mad, death-dealing hornet. They didn't do a thing but petrify 
that geology class for about a mile and a half down the river. 

As might be imagined the party by this time was not in the best of humor; and an 
incident happened which did not add to the general cheerfulness. "Just our luck," 
groaned Sammy Palmer, "there's a thunder shower coming up and we'll have to put for 

the nearest farm house." "Might as well stay here and let this d d day finish up 

with us," growled France. However, his was the dissenting voice, and the whole geol- 
ogy expedition began an ignominious retreat to shelter. That proved to be leagues away, 
and all were thoroughly drenched before they reached it. 

The group that was met at the door by Farmer E 's pretty daughter, was not a 

very artistic one. Clark with a first class phrenological specimen of a head, and a nose to 
match : France with one eye neatly closed and glaring from the other on Owen, whose 
ears didn't mate and whose face was a combination of small pox and yellow fever. De 
La Fleur, the hatless, and Stone and Palmer were the most presentable of the group; but, 
even they were bedraggled, dripping wet and madder than the hornets. Last but not 
least in grotesqueness, came Prof. Smyth, clad a la tramp, without coat, necktie or socks, 
and with those long legs of his plastered with mud. And poor Ely ! As the awful thought 
dawned upon his mind that there was a lady on the place, he tried to be as little con- 
spicuous as possible. His somewhat airy costume had not been improved by the shower, 
and he now presented the appearance of a water nymph or an Atlantic City bather. 

But the farmer's daughter let them in. It must have been "Freddie's " beard which 
did it, for that was all that was left of their former respectability. And now the most 
enjoyable part of the day set in. Owen and France actually were able to finish their 
naps ; Ely became used to his appearance and began to make eyes at the fair sex; and the 
hearts of all were liightened by George Stone, whose mammoth mind had devised a very 
original scheme. Why not wait and dry off until dark and then drive home in the farm- 
er' s wagon ! By that plan they would be ' ' pleasing their inwards' ' for the nonce and would 

153 



escape all scurfs and any chance of losing the way home. 

The plan met with approval immediately. Many unseen influences were beginning 
to make themselves felt, and all were loath to leave. The kitchen fire was cosy; the class 
was tired: the farmer's daughter was pretty; the farmer himself a jolly old party. Then 

Mrs. E appeared from the cellar with about a half bushel of doughnuts and two 

gallons of cider, and an enthusiastic yell from the Coxeyites of the party carried the day. 
Leave cider like that ? Well, I guess not. 

As they drove home in the lumbering farm wagon, they had plenty of time to record 
several solemn vows. They would never disclose a single particular of that memorable 
day. Henceforth they would carefully avoid bulls and hornet's nests. Eight separate 
internal pledges were taken to revisit that farm and that pretty farmer's daughter, queen 
of doughnuts and hard cider ; and lastly, they would hold a consolation meeting to count 
up losses and see whether it paid to elect geology. At that meeting they came to the 
conclusion that it did not, and that taking it all in all, Smyth was not a snap. The fol- 
lowing memorandum of their losses is the reason for such a decision : 

Smyth — All his dignity; one pair of socks, and a coat and necktie. 

Stone — A hat and coat; a walk home of five miles, and an untold amount of energy. 

Palmer— All his petrified specimens, including three fishes and two bird's eggs; also, 
Owen's and France's outfits. 

De La Fleur — One plug hat; one shoe, and a heap of respectability. 

France — About ten pounds of flesh; a half thousand cuss-words, and two quarts of 
hard cider, which modesty forbade his taking. 

Owen — His geology outfit, and several hours of sleep. 

Buell — One spring suit; one chance to work the Excuse Committee, and his tooth- 
brush. 

Clark — Two years' growth; a cane, and a fine specimen of a petrified hornet's nest. 




154 



A ^Senior's Question 



TELL me gray-haired man, who at the door 

Of life prepares to say the last Amen, 
Is life mere shifting pictures, — nothing more, — 

Which charm and grieve and pass beyond our ken ? 



Does love grow cold, and die and pass away ? 

Do friendship's bonds relax and break apart ? 
Do care and trial make darkness out of day ? 

Do frost and wrinkles come upon the heart ? 



Do men forget the impulses of youth, 
The manly striving up toward lofty goals, 

The love for honor and the zeal for truth, 
As further out the thread of life unrolls ? 



O ! tell me, grey-haired man, is life a jest, 
A jest to laugh at or a jest to scorn ; 

A grand exciting comedy at best, 
To cease at evening, to begin at morn ? 



B. M. B. 



155 



Commencement 5 on 9- 



I I I H5>S'W/lft/ifo:eiR sbaoows 
111 Dance o'er tbe plain, 
/ J. \ JGlossomeo ano raoiant 
5une conies again. 
HMcib-tioe of memory, 

£rv>st of tbe £ears, 
Wangling in nieloo^, 
Xainibtcr ano tears. 

*Morft tbine encbantmcnt, 

Subtle perfume! 
Summon onr £estcroa£s, 

/Rustical bloom ! 
IRoses ano romances 

Strew as of olo, 
Bttar for asbes, 

before life is colo. 

Souno, silent voices, 

tfaint, far^awap. ; 
/Ifturmur Bolian 

JEcboes to^oap. ! 
JEyee tbat are answerless 

Sparftle once more ! 
Goucb ours, pe vanisbeO bancs, 

5ust as before ! 



156 



TI)e RaDe of tl)e E>ocfy 



Nolueram, Belinda, tuos violarc capillos 
Sed juvat, hoc precibus me tribuissc tuis. 

—Mart. 

AN HEROI-COMICRL POEM, WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1895. 



\ELINDA was a dainty little maiden of degree, 
fP)) Upon her neck reposed two pretty locks ; 

Lord Vetre gained upon them and he vowed courageously 
That he'd have them if they put him in the stocks. 

How very fine to show them to his friends down at the club ! 

Have them guessing " whose .?" between the deals at whist ; 
Jlnd with a knowing nod and wink to give Sir Vlume a rub 

z/Jnd watch him rave and fume ? Who could resist ? 

" ' Tis awful nice" Lord Vetre thought, " to tease a lass a mite, 
i/Jnd trophies such as these are very rare ; 
So stoutly for the dreadful fray he armed himself that night 
To win the precious gems, two locks of hair. 

'Belinda, guarded by a sylph, serenely sipped her tea, 

'But thoughts of love, alas, crept in her heart. 
The sylph her post deserted, and surreptitiously 

The naughty, bad Lord Tetre played his part. 

The fair 'Belinda pouted and the fierce Sir Vlume, he swore, 
'But the valiant peer, Lord Vetre, did not care, 

To all his violent raving he answered this — -no more— 
You can have the girl but I will have the hair. 

C B. (M. 'B., '95. 



157 



Tf)e I9itcf)fild Observatory. 



I HAT there is here an astronomical observatory is due quite certainly to the 
X^ ^ remarkable series of lectures on Astronomy delivered by General 
0. M. Mitchell. About 1852, a strong effort was made to arouse interest in 
the College and to increase its facilities. Considerable money was raised and 
expended in various improvements. The late Dr. Root's cabinet of minerals, 
shells and fossils was purchased and with the collections previously at the 
College, put in some order. The Chemical Laboratory was built and the 
Chemical Prize established. The Old Gymnasium was erected and equipped. 
It should be noted that the "Old Gym.," poor as it seems now, was a great 
thing forty years ago. 

Probably the most important addition of these times was the Observatory. 
At first there was only the main square with its cylindered dome and two 
small wings, one for a study and the other for the clock and transit instru- 
ment. The two small domes on the west were added later. The telescope — 
it was a great instrument for that day, — was built by Spencer & Eaton, of 
Canastota, and was held a triumph of American ingenuity and skill. 

The late Dr. Root was at that time Professor of Astronomy and gave in- 
struction in the subject ; but he had given no attention to observing, and 
had no facility in the use of the instruments or familiarity with the computa- 
tions. He insisted that the observatory demanded a director. Fortunately, 
the late Dr. Peters, then an assistant in the Dudley Observatory at Albany, 
was not in harmony with Mr. Gould, the director, and was desirous of 
change. Seven hundred dollars was raised by private, subscription, and Dr. 
Peters was induced to come here for that annual stipend. 

159 



With Dr. Peters the real observatory — the shell with a soul in it — be- 
gan. The story of what he did in thirty years has been often told; it 
should never be forgotten. It is well that his monument in the beautiful 
College Cemetery with its Greek legend, "He discovered the measures and 
meanderings of the stars," attracts attention. It is most fitting that year by 
year by his grave flowers shall bloom — for the Doctor loved flowers as well as 
stars. This delicate tribute of Dr. Chester proves how truly one man of science 
may know and honor another. It would not be unfitting that some of our 
classes leaving a memorial should place upon the pier of the telescoj^e beneath 
the large dome, a tablet making fuller mention of Dr. Peters' life work. 

The Hamiltonian is very glad to give to its readers a handsome view of 
the Observatory. 

It is in charge for the time of Dr. Saunders, Professor of Physics. While 
he can give all direct instruction needed for our regular classes, all students 
cherish the hope that the trustees may speedily give to the Observatory a 
director, and the sun and stars again give on our hill-top glimpses of their 
story. 




160 



%icb bes Spielmans. 



w 



ENN leis' die Abendglocken 
Durch Flur and Feld verhallt, 
Hab' ich den ragenden Tannen 
Gelauscht in dammernden Wald. 

Der einsamen Wipfel Erschauern, 
Wenn der Wind mit ihnen gespielt, 

Den Geist hab' ich verstanden; 
Ich hab' ihn im Busen gefiihlt. 
Der Saiten leises Sehnen, 

Dem sinnend ihr zugehort, 
Im Wald die rauschenden Tannen, 
Sie haben's mich gelehrt. 



Am moosigen Rande der Quellen 

Hab' oftmals ich geweilt, 
Wo mit lustigem Platschern die Wellen 

Dem Thalgrund zngeeilt. 
Von Stein zu Steine sprangen 

Sie keck und voller Lust, 

Dem stillen Lauscher sangen 

Sie Frohsinn in die Brust. 

Die lustig frohlichen Weisen, 

Die ihr so gem gehort, 
Die hat der Quellen Murmeln 
Und Platschern mich gelehrt. 



Ich trotzte dem tobenden Sturme 

Gar oft in wilder Nacht, 
Wenn donnernd die schaumenden Wogen 

Am Strand sich brachen mit Macht. 
Wenn Winde die Diinen durchrasten 

Und mir die Haare zerzaust, 
In bebender Brust verstand ich 
Das Lied, das sie gebraust. 

Und wenn mit maehtigem Klange 

Die Hand durch die Saiten fahrt, 
Das hat mit wildem Drange 
Der Sturm wind mich gelehrt. 



Als ich die Welt durchfahren, 

Hab' einst ich ein Miigdlein gesehn 
Mit langen blonden Haaren 

Und Augen wundersam schon. 
Da ward Ich ganz versunken, 
Hab' tief darein geschaut, 
Hab' Wonne daraus getrunken 
LTnd hab' gejubelt laut. 

Und wenn der Tone Ver'langen 

Bestrickend euch bethort, 
Das hat in ihrem Prangen 
Das Magdlein mich gelehrt. 



A. W. B., '97. 



161 



Wf)id)? Botf)l 




OWN into the quiet streets I step, 

tAll the busier thoroughfares I shun, 
VXever looking, nor to left, nor right ; 
Thinking only, " Love I both, or one ?" 
Olivia, the dark brunette, or {May, 

The fairy blonde, with wavy locks of gold — 
Which do I love ? My heart doth turn which way ? 
Speak heart, and soon this mystery unfold ! 



<A corner turned, another passed, and there 

"Before me stands, in all her beauty, Fairy {May. 
She seemed a roving spirit of the air — 

The gayest butterfly of all the gay. 
She seemed innocence improved by art — 

CP{o conscious blush her sunny face e'er knew. 
Her simple sweetness seized my wavering heart, 

(And bade me softly swear, " 'To {May T m trueP 



The evening sun was setting fast, and so 

I rapidly increased my lagging gait. 
<A step behind — / turned, and lo ! 

Olivia I met, I met my fate. 
With chestnut curl she wove a cunning snare, 

Cemented it with sparks from ha^el eye ; 
IV 'ho such a pleasing net to break would care ? 

Or such a tempting danger, care to fly ? 

J^ captive wretch, nor longer could I rove. 

{My conqueror held me fast and bade me say — 
" ' Tis thee, Olivia, alone I love, 

My heart burns not for Fairy May?' 1 
Perfidious youth, and perjured villian he! 

Who thus so lightly treats his solemn oath. 
But hold! From condemnation harsh V m free ; 

Neither I loved, because — / loved them both. 

"D.R.r '94- 



L62 



Experiences of our Advertising Agent, 



■©— 



HE readers of this volume never think of the exertion, the expendi- 
ture, the trials that it costs to publish such an annual. To choose 
the best from the car-loads of artistic work that comes rushing in 
upon us, and to select the finest from the mountains of masterly literature 
that overwhelm our literary editor are both most difficult tasks. But to 
solicit the advertisements, that are the financial foundation of the publica- 
tion ; this is by far the hardest work of all. 

Just imagine youself the companion of our " ad " agent some bright 
morning as he leaves for the city of lunatics. At the first few places 
he enters, he is successful in his efforts. Hundreds of dollars have 
been turned into the pockets of these tradesmen from advertisements 
well-placed in former Hamiltonians. No arguments are needed with 
them; the agent's heart rejoices and he enters the next place with high 
hopes and soaring expectations. He displays '95's excellent book; simply, 
states the object of his visit ; and then proceeds to show the incalculable 
advantages of advertising in this book. " Its circulation ten thousand ; 
readers best class of people; goes into all the college club houses of the land; 
students patronize those who patronize them," etc., etc, etc. The ada- 
mantine heart of that merchant seems untouched : he listens with a steel 
like glare in his eye. Then comes his reply as fervent as the agent's plea 
was eloquent. " Don't want any space in that book. Don't want any 
college trade. College men are a gang of thieves. Have got a lot of 
uncollectable bills out there now. Good day." The corners of our 
representative's mouth suddenly drop as far below the horizontal as they 
had been above it before he "tackled" the tradesman. And he leaves 
his grouchy patron thinking that lile is not all a bed of roses and water- 
melons. 

He enters another store. His eloquence is somewhat cooled b} T the late 
rebuff, but the snap of Hamilton oratory is there yet. The soul-stirring plea 
he presents would turn a book agent green with envy. The audience 

1(33 



scorns favorably impressed. He asks about prices, space, etc. But be 
thinks that the men in bis line of business in Clinton get all the trade. 
The agent persists that there is no man in his business in Clinton. The 
flow of eloquence continues. With a dramatic gesture the agent throws 
open the book, and alas ! Misfortune is with him. There, upon separate 
pages, face to face, arc two "ads" — witnesses of his perfidy. Two "ads" 
of the business that is not represented in Clinton ! The merchant thinks 
he does't want any space; and with a jerk of desperation the unfortunate 
solicitor pulls his bat over his eyes, and rushes out into the street with the 
resolution to start a trolley car list in Utica, Sober second thought pre- 
vails and he wanders on to the next place, mutttering something about 
honesty being the best policy. 

The next attempt developes a new difficulty. " The proprietor has 
just gone out; will be back in a few minutes; sit down and wait." 
Our agent sits and waits, and the few minutes grow into an hour. Fin- 
ally the proprietor enters, but is so busy that he cannot attend to the 
matter now, "call again." In a few days the agent "calls again" and 
then is told when to call again. This plan works equally well with an 
"ad " solicitor and a bill-collector. 

" It's an ill wind that blaws naebody good." The desolating finan- 
cial panic which has swept over the country has furnished our business 
men with a magnificent lot of unanswerable excuses for economizing. If 
their wives ask for a new hat, " Times are dull and they can't afford it." 
If a reputable man asks them to build up their patronage by well-placed 
advertising, they reply; "No business — can't afford it." They forget the 
great business axiom of the nineteenth century, "The extensive adver- 
tiser makes the money." One of these calamity howlers met our agent 
as lie entered the office of a large shoe establishment. The mournful 
face that he assumed as be drawled out his pitiful story, would have 
brought tears to the eyes of " Red " Blake. Our representative is not 
devoid of feeling. That face reminded him of the heart-rending scene 
of bis father weeping over the empty purse of his deceased mother-in- 
law; so the tender hearted fellow left the pathetic shop keeper, with 
-pi rit- depressed and aching heart. 

One other excuse was an insurmountable barrier to our oft insulted and 
much rejected agent. Our solicitor enters an ostentatious emporium of 
literature. The amiable red-whiskered proprietor advances all the pleas 

104 



that have been related and then adds another. He would be delighted 
to accommodate us in spite of the fact that he hasn't made a cent in a year, 
but the funds laid aside for advertising purposes have all been expended 
and he will be obliged to decline this offer. We found out that "the 
funds " spoken of so pompously, amounted to just $3.65. 

But at the same time that this tireless agent was making calls he 
was also writing letters. Out of some five hundred letters sent out he 
perhaps got fifty answers. Some of these replies were very amusing. 
Of course many firms wrote early to secure space, while others were not 
so prompt nor so eager. A letter from one of the latter class is repro- 
duced below and will suffice to amplify the last excuse mentioned as 
wielded with such skill and effect by these business men. The letter is 
from a Jersey firm : 




"The above is the advertising manager of the D Company. He is not as cross 

as he looks, but, whether wisely or not, he has spent all the advertising funds allowed 
him, and is in deep sorrow that his penniless condition will not enable him to accept a 
million or two of the gilt-edged offers daily presented. He has made all the excuses, 
quibbles, and promises his conscience will permit or his ingenuity can invent. 

A bsque argento omnia vana. 
Which is freely translated in Jersey to mean, "All is vanity when pockets are inside out." 

We will not lead you farther over this horrible path-way of chagrin 
and suffering. To all who have not had this dire experience, our agent 
would say: "If you ever contemplate soliciting 'ads,' think twice, and 
don't do it, There is only one other man who can sink so low and yet 
keep his feet within the pale of respectability. That man is a book 
agent." 

165 




Potty Winter. 



(I 



N Autumn twisted beech-nut boughs, 
In Winter-time the holly, 
In Spring-time pink hepaticas ; 
It's all the same to Polly. 



She'll never say, " You cunning man, 
The beech-nut bough you've bended, 

B<ut guerdon give you laughingly 
And so your trouble's ended. 



Or if beneath a holly branch 

From you she has retreated, 
She'll never run away and say: 
" You naughty man, you've cheated. 



Although the tint is red or blue, 
Or even something duller, 

Just claim 'tis pinkest kind of pink 
And she won't stick on color. 



O ! she's a jolly, jolly girl, 

In Autumn, Spring or Winter; 
She's won the heart of every one, 

My pretty Polly Minter. 

B. M. B. 



166 



1 I)e 1 I)reaf of tt)e Woman's Oaffragist 



s~\ HE'D show 'cm some fine day 
^Woman's work wa'n't no child's play 
,-.. _ J So she would ; 

That it wa'n't no fun to scrub, 
An : clean, an' polish up, an' rub, 
An' look after "siss" and "bub"— 
Yes ! she should. 



The cure for all this trouble 
Is to make the suffrage double, 

Female sisters! 
Women know ez much ez men 
Six of them is good ez ten 
Of that most conceited "clen," 

Known as "Misters." 



Woman's work would make men crazy- 
Men were good-fur-nothin'-lazy, 

So she said. 
And she'd like to see 'em make 
Ginger cookies, pie, er cake, 
Er even try to bake 

A loaf of bread. 



They'd warm taters in a griddle ; 
They can't hardly thread a needle ; 

They can't sew 
A button on a coat or vest, 
To give their wife a "minute's" rest ; 
An' house-cleanin' time "they guessed 

They'd better go." 



'F she had a man to hum, 
He'd help do the work that cum, 

Or he'd-be wretchet. 
She'd show him how to work, 
An' 'f he tried to shirk, 
Baldheaded would she jerk— 

Oh ! how he'd ketch it i 



How all will be changed, 
When the details is arranged, 

An' women vote. 
Women's rights '11 hev full sway ; 
Men'll hev to clear the way ; 
It's goin to come some day — 

'Tanin't remote. 



Hasten then the glorious time, 
When women folks in every clime 

Shall hev their right. 
Then men ! if ye don't move ye, 
Bein' just a notch above ye, 
We'll perceed straightway to shove ye 

Out of sight, 

"D. R. 



167 



A Dream. 




— c— 

9 

' OXDERFUL was that transformation ! I must tell 
you, dear reader, an incident of my life. For forty 
years I had been a janitor in the old college buildings 
at Hamilton. It was in the year 2000, and during 
all that time darkness had reigned over the old hill- 
side. The very joys of life were always dead here. I 
never knew the cause, but one night I had a won- 
derful dream, and the inspiration of that evening 
changed me from a menial day laborer to a station, at least one round more 
exalted — a minister. 

This was my dream : It was spring. The birds were singing in the 
tree tops. The gentle zephyrs were waving the smallest branches of the 
maples. The sun was pouring down with unusual zeal. The Oriskany 
hastened over the sloping bed Through the distant valley, and all nature 
was at its sublimest. Upon the old world-renowned hilltop I seemed 
to be employed about my usual occupation of cleaning the electric 
lamps and managing the electric car station, when in my rounds I noticed 
the form of a human being lying prostrate beneath the chapel spire. I stirred 
the figure and when the face was turned toward me I saw a wonderful sight. 
It was hairy and a long black moustache enveloped the mouth. A wonder- 
ful collar, like unto one my grandmother used to show me in pictures, 
encircled his neck. It had no open front but was fastened in the back. A loosely 
tied black ribbon nearly covered the collar. His clothes were queer things 
too. The back had tail-like endings and really the man had on trousers 
similar to those worn by the women of to-day. 

I asked the stranger his name and with short, quick accents he told me 
that he was known as "Bill;" that once he had been a professor in the 
college beneath whose chapel spire he now had sought rest and shelter. He 
told me a wonderful story and I will relate it as he told it to me. " I was 
;i professor in Hamilton College, sir, in the year 1895 and had been for many 
years. 1 had formerly graduated from that institution and from Auburn 
Theological Seminary. I had intended to preach for a living and try to save 
gouls. But Fate led me back to my Alma Mater. I tried preaching, but 
when I stood before my parishoners my knees trembled. I felt deathly faint. 
I turned pale and could not stand the strain of the assembled gaze before me. 
I felt that my calling was not the ministry. I had made a great mistake. 
I made up my mind to teach. Hamilton opened her doors to me, for I had a 
wonderful mind and could grasp the deepest problems of logic and political 



economy with an agility never before known. The last year I remember in 
college was 1895. I had a Senior division in Hebrew and under my super- 
vision they made rapid strides. But I must not forget to tell you that the 
men were very dull and, if any other than I had attempted to teach them that 
most difficult language the result would certainly have been more pitiful 
than it was. In the first examination, in Hebrew, I undertook a novel 
method. I knew the men had done very poorly, yes, much worse than I 
ever did when I was in college. I told them beforehand that the 'exam.' 
would be oral and so they must prepare for that ; but when the time came I 
made them write it and with the aid of a, little German with which one of 
the men was acquainted I saw him ' safely through. ' The other men kicked 
but I flunked them just the same. 

" Then I had classes in Bible, in Logic and in Political Economy. My 
faith in religion was fast becoming shattered. My Bible recitations I could 
make nothing out of but discussions in Logic. The same class, that famous 
old class of '96, which was always at the front in everything pertaining to 
college life, were not backward in logical discussions. Oh ! how well I remember 
that man Hewitt ; I liked him because he always opposed my ideas and yet I 
could see that he saw in me the consummation of everything great ; he said 
cute things in class and that took uptime and made my work easier and 
amused the class. In Political Economy, Babtist I especially admired, 
because he always saw everything great and worthy in my ideas, as to be sure 
there was. 

" But where have I been since 1895? Well I was in Logic one day. We 
had been discussing the advisability of reading the Bible in public schools, 
when I was suddenly transported from this world to a place where mind and 
matter are distinct. Darkness rules there. It is a terrible place. I can not 
tell where it is. Nobody knows. But through the workings of my own mind 
I have been allowed to revisit my old home. I am weak. The sun here 
overcomes me. I know I must return." 

Here my strange friend ceased. He gasped once or twice. I was 
speechless as I saw him wafted above the earth by unseen forces and suddenly 
disappear above the clouds. But they were black ones now. The 
thunder roared. Sharp lightning flashed across the sky. The atmosphere 
was smoky and darkness suddenly enveloped the land. Ah ! then I knew 
what it was to have one who could bring sunshine and gladness to mankind. 
Here I had been face to face with the source of all knowledge, and the 
professor I realized was the light of the world — in Logic and sociology ; in 
Religion and Economy, in all things mental and physical. The old hillside 
was again ruled by skeptcism and mystery. Oh ! How I wished that he could 
have stayed. How much clearer everything appeared then. But now he 

had gone to lands unknown, and I awoke. Truly yours, 

Class of 1995. Rev. Father Blake. 





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70 



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171 




r<-H^ 



Tf)e Acrid of f t)e Bonnet. 

— ©— 
2K*! the maid of the bonnet : 

'With flowers all over, 
^?\nd ribbons upon it. 
^{ theme for a sonnet, 
The maid of the bonnet. 

INg wonder $ lore hzr — 
The maid of the bonnet 

'With flowers all over. 

u Ihe Jylost Beautiful JYLomeat." 



(From the German, of Korner.) 

Beautiful ! when two stars 
Together in the heavens shine. 
Beautiful ! whzri two roses 
Their opening buds entwine. 

T^et more beautiful far — 
jyCost beautiful, in truth, to see 
I/we souls bound fast together 
ilaa hotu unity. 

^ " "©.it" 

172 




(in Mcxir vitf) C3cf)nit£. 



HE scene is the Modern Language room. The event about to 
be enacted is a French recitation. From the wall Lessing and 
Schiller cast frowns of disapproval at the Gaellic pollution of 
their Teutonic sanctorum. The door opens and the victims of 
the approaching contest enter. "Chick" waddles in with a 
pipe and a smile adorning his face. " Bill " swaggers after with 
his imitation of a dignified gait, and his usual artificial air of 
disregard for every thing and every one except "Bill." If you 
are not a Darwinian, you immediately become one when the next man enters. An over- 
grown boy follows the missing link. This is " Kid." Last of all comes the mogul of this 
little realm. He is of medium height and rather stout. His eyes are Spanish; his 
moustache Japanese; his gait French. 

After he has seated himself, taken out his watch and placed it on his table, he begins: 
" Dat's preddy easy French to-day. We won'dt read all of it. Has any one found 
any drouble from de sixdy-fifth to de nindy-second pages?" 

There seems to have been no difficulties met with, as no reply comes from the class. 

" Yell, then, Mr. L , dranslate once dat passage beginning at de dop of de sevendy- 

first page. ' La poesie'' and so forth." 

" Beg your pardon, Professor, I don't see where you mean." 
" Vhy, don'dt you see — Oh! it's de eighdy-firdst. " 

Mr. L translates well until he says : " He came from reading — " 

" Dere, dere, Mr. L , how many dimes have I dold you about dat ' venir de. 7 You 

just dry dat in de examination, and I pluck you. See! Just keep still now. We 

don'dt want any more of you. Mr. W dranslate a liddle on de nindy-first page." 

Mr. W translates without interruption. Then Schnitz adjusts his spectacles* 

scans the page of the text closely, and smiles with grim delight when the object of his 
search appears. He has found a word whose root is planted under Pluto's throne. 
" Facilis descensus averni " is true for some people, and the indefatigable etymological 
Dutchman has found the origin of that word. What a malignant leer of satisfaction 
takes possession of his face as he quietly asks : 

" Mr. W , can you give the etymology of ' gouter' ? " 

" I don't believe I know that, Professor. I cut seminary yesterday." 

"Yell, Mr. AY , de glass goes right on. even ven de big bugs are not here. The 

derivation of that word is very peguliar. De Chinese had a word ' gutajah,' meaning 'to 
limp.' It is evident dat de Chinese had some associations with de North American 
Indians, becauz de Frenchmen in America got a word from de Indians which must have 
come from de Chinese word. This Indian word was ' giitems,' which meant indigestion. 
De connection can easily be seen. Eating green abbles causes indigestion, and dereby 
limping. De acts of eating and tasting are similar. So you can see how dis word came 
to have its present meaning." 

" Does de glass find any dirfigulty from de nindy-second to de one hundred and fif- 
deenth page ? ' ' 

Mr. R — — asks: " Professor, will you explain that expression in the fourteenth line 
on page one hundred and ten ? ' ' 

173 



Schnitz smiles. " Oh, dat's real Victor Hugo. He never pndts things as any other 
man would. Dere's a good parody on Hugo. ' De dog is bitten by de flea. De dog can 
iK »t reach de flea. Agony ! ' ' The class laughs. Schnitz grins, and W-rn-r yells to raise a 
9.9 recitation to 10. 

" De nexdt dime you may skip from de one hundred and sixteenth page to de hun- 
dred and thirdieth page. Commence with de hundred and thirdieth page and dake to de 
two hundred and nindy-fifth page for de next dime." Looks at his watch and continues: 
" We've got a few minutes left. I digtate a few notes. Lemme see. There did ve leave 
ofdt? Oh, yes." 

The scene which follows would make the most pessimistic believe in the final union 
of all races and tongues. Here is a German with Japanese whiskers and Spanish optics 
in a French recitation lecturing on Portuguese literature in an American college. The 
uninitiated would never dream of the terrors lurking behind that innocent and unassum- 
ing remark : "I digtate a few notes. ' ' The three thousand concealed English at Waterloo 
\\ere not more terrible to the Old Guard than are these " few notes " to a French class. 
As Schnitz is utterly unmindful of the limitations of time, when he assigns lessons, so lie 
fails to consider that the celerity of penmanship is limited. It takes him some time to find 
where the last dictation ended; but when once that place is found, he starts off and con- 
tinues to move in a manner and at a rate that beggars description. Tumbling, rolling, 
hurtling, pushing, the sounds of that monotonous mumble seek admission at the ear. 
French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Roumanian, Dacian names mingle in 
bewildering confusion. Schnitz's disregard for unity is charming. As in a range of 
mountains, here and there towering peaks rise above their fellows and stand out clear and 
prominent above their monotonous surroundings, so in this desert of words, here and 
there remarks, inapt and misplaced it may be, but bold and striking, rise above environ- 
ment. In the midst of a discussion of the Italian epic, it is stated that Columbus dis- 
covered America. While the beauties of Spanish tragedy are being praised, the class is 
reminded that " we got Alsace-Lorraine back again, dough." While this versatile med- 
ley of races is thus pouring forth his comprehensive remarks, the miserable victims 
bend over their note-books; pens break; ink flies; pencils snap; fingers are cramped; 
frantic efforts to turn pages without losing a word are seen; but that never-changing 
growl sounds on. Suddenly the torture is, for an instant, relieved. From the midst of a 
small bunch of humanity there comes: 

"What's that name?" 

A scowl and a snarl from the reader. 

" Vat name?" 

"That king." 

"Alphonso VI?" 

"No. I have that," 

" Vat you dink, Mr. E , dat I can rebeat dree or four dimes for you? Vat would 

you do if you were in a Cherman university. You'd have to scrachdt dere. No asking 
' Vat is dat name ' dere." 

Our labor is about to recommence, when on our ears there falls a sound sweeter even 
than the noon-day whistle to the mason's clerk, the chapel bell. A cloud of disappoint- 
ment and a frown of displeasure fight for the mastery on that swarthy countenance. The 
lecture ends with: 

"Oh, dear! How dime does fly. We don't have half enough dime. I suppose dat 
you'll have to go." 

And they go. 

174 



With sSue. 



(Selected from the Hamilton Review.) 



A GENTLE maid and her lover strayed, 1 
While the west wind's wanton wooing, : 
Of moor and fen and tangled 3 glen, 4 
Made it seem the time for sueing. 5 

The youth waxed bold, his tale soon told, 6 
Then began his boldness rueing — 

But the maiden's sigh and tell-tale eye 7 
Gave answer " Yes" to his si wing. d. 8 



1. Note the consummate skill with which the author introduces the Dramatis Personx of the poem in the 

first line. 

2. Well worded alliteration constitutes the art of poetry. How delightfully suggestive is the conduct of 

the west wind ; what a delicate charm of delicious sweetness this line throws over the poem. 

3. The full force of the adjective should be observed. It inspires the reader's curiosity. Did they pass 

through the tangled glen ? What was it about the glen that was tangled? 

4. The poet is quite Wordsworthian in the natural scenery of this line. The happy couple, carried away 

by the charm of a summer's evening, must have wandered considerably. 

5. Mark the versatility of the author. This is a pun. 

6. The reader must congratulote the youth in his ability to tell the tale soon. Many of us have experienced 

a feeling of hesitancy under the same circumstances. 

7. The poet leaves to the imagination the ecstacies of the fortunate young man. This is one of the great- 

est charms of poetry : the vista of possibilities that each word and phrase opens to the reader. 
Here is the whole history of the maiden's life of love and doubts and fears condensed into one 
glowing line. 

8. We do not know who the poet is who veils his personality under the nam <le plume of " D.," but we con- 

gratulate him upon his pen sketch of student life ; and we venture to predict an eventful future for 
him in the literary world. 



175 



Man! ti)e flipper. 




E were sitting 'neath the roses, 

She and I. 
Cupid in the background poses 

Quite near by;— 
Artful, cunning, crafty, Cupid, 
Wideawake, and nothing stupid 

Roguish, sly. 



We were playing hunt the slipper, 

She and I. 
Cupid listens, laughs, grows chipper; 

Winks his eye. 
Thinks he knows where she can find it; 
Smiles when I'm before— behind it; 

Let's us try. 



" Bye and bye when you're grown older- 
Old as I," 

Said the young wretch, growing bolder, 
"Bye and bye"— 

And he gave a little shiver— 

" He's got it hidden in his quiver," 
So said I. 



And the dainty silver buckle 

Now I spy. „ 
With a low, triumphant chuckle 

Then I cry, 
"Oh you boastful, saucy fairy! 
Tho' you think so, you're not wary 

Don't deny, 



That it's underneath that arrow." 

" I won't lie," 
Said impish Cupid, "but beware, oh! 

Don't come nigh ! 
For I'll shoot you if you steal it, 
Shoot you hard, so that you'le feel it, 

And you'll die."— 



But I heeded not his warning 

Said "Ofie"! 
Stole it from him 'ere the morning 

Sun was high. 
But my enemy he watched me, 
With an arrow's point he scratched me. 

Oh the spy ! 



Was I wounded? Can't express it. 

Did I die ? 
And the sequel ? You can guess it, 

If you try. 
" Cupid lad, of course, was furious "- 
Really, now you're very curious 

So "Bye bye." 

"D. R 

176 



An Moar vitf) "&. G." 




RECITATION in rhetoric is curiously and remarkably con- 
ducted. First the occupant of the instructor's chair is a 
peculiar production of creative genius. The chair in 
which he sits seems to be of usual size, and the table 
before him is not lower than the ordinary recitation-room 
table; yet the uncomfortable-appearing director of this class- 
room seems to experience great difficulty in disposing of his 
pedal extremities under that table. By compulsion rather 
than by choice, he solves the difficulty by twisting one several times around the other, 
and then pushing both out into the shins of the unfortunate fellow sitting before him. 

The general attitude of the class is equally worthy of study. An appearance of 
weariness seems to pervade the room. One man sleeps serenely against the wall; another 
draws pictures and divers monograms on that same wall; while still another consults 
his watch at frequent intervals, and at each look his face assumes an expression more 
and more intense. Time evidently rests heavily in his pocket as well as on 
his hands. He begins to doubt the veracity of his watch; for the first fifteen minutes 
seems fully an hour. A select few on the back seats are more interested, judging from 
appearances, for every man has an open book in his lap. Their studious spirit is some- 
what hampered by occasional suspicious glances from the perceptor in their direction. 
Wherever those glances come, the eyes of the back-seaters are always gazing on the ceil- 
ing or the black-board with great indifference of appearance. This contest might be 
bulletined among the sporting events as " Cribbers vs. Prof.," or "Honor vs. Honors." 

From certain wandering remarks, a visitor would finally conclude that the subject of 
the day is amplification. There is one admirable feature about the teacher, he follows the 
rules of his text-book. He practices what he preaches. When a student does not quote 
the book verbatim, the angular professor, with fragmentary ("Hops.," by permission) 
sentences and right-angled gestures expatiates ad infinitum on the particular phrase which 
the text employs upon the subject in question. Speaking of gestures, there is one in par- 
ticular that deserves especial attention. As the words, " We need amplification in argu_ 
ment," come in deep reverberating tones from the lips over-shaded by that stately mili- 
tary moustache, a long arm is launched out toward that small but select audience, and on 
the end of that arm is a finger equal in length to the arm. From the shoulder to the end of 
the finger the monotony of configuration is relieved by curves of charming grace. There 



177 



is only one object that can rival that arm and finger for beanty of contour. That object 
is a broken stick. 

Mr. A is called upon to point out the defect in a paragraph given in the text. 

The sight of a drowning man making that time-memorable clutch for the delusive straw 

is not more touching than Mr. A giving a critical discourse on the mistakes in this 

paragraph from Macaulay, which now for the first time torments his eye. What is lack- 
ing in critical ability is amply made up by ingenuity. The criticisms passed on that 
masterpiece of English are awful. Could that great writer have heard these comments 
upon his efforts, he would have died from grief and shame. But these learned comments 
seem to be entirely unappreciated by " B. G." when the veracity of the facts is attacked. 
" B. G." does not know about the historical aspects of the case. He is not there to teach 

history. When Mr. A attempts to criticise the paragraph rhetorically, he seems to 

be out of his element at first; but suddenly there flashes through his mind a recitation in 
Freshman rhetoric that astonished the class and dumbfounded the professor by its bril- 
liancy. The transformation of Mr. A is marvelous; that cloud of doubt and uncer- 
tainty leaves his face; he throws back his head proudly; casts a look of triumphant defi- 
ance at his tormentor; and says, with an air of the firmest conviction: " That paragraph 
is faulty because it lacks unity, coherence and mass." Oh! ye departed shades of Delos, 
thanks to your timely inspiration, a disgraceful "flunk" is changed into a glorious 
"blood." 

The next man called starts off with some degree of precision and accuracy. He is a 
back-seater. Suddenly " B. G." catches hold of an expression that to him is very 
strange. " Mr. B ," he says, " how do you pronounce that foreign phrase in the mid- 
dle of the second paragraph on the seventy-second page?" The alien is "a comte." 

Mr. B pronounces correctly; and " B. G." remarks in a tone of surprise: "Why, 

Mr. B , I thought you pronounced final "e" in German? " " So you do, in German.; " 

and the subject is dropped. 

Time and the recitation move on. Several more unfortunates prove their ignorance 
in endeavoring to show their wisdom. A quotation excites some discussion as to its 
origin. It is finally suggested that it is taken from "Tristram Shandy," and " B. G." 
thinks that Stearns wrote that book; but he is not sure of it either. "However, it 
doesn't matter. I am not here to teach English literature. We will confine ourselves to 
the subject before us." 

The class is at length dismissed. As they come out " B. G." begs a cigarette from 

K , and shambles down the walk toward the chapel. He looks worried. No wonder. 

The next hour promises to be one of agony for him. He is going to drill a K. P. man. 
" B. G.," our sympathy is yours! We hear these embryo Demosthenes but once, when 
culling and pruning has brought them to perfection. You are the unfortunate to whom 
is allotted the unpleasant task of creating orators out of wheesy voices and stupid awk- 
wardness. 

178 



Tfye 5opf)omore. 



NDER a shady poplar tree 
The lazy student lies ; 
The Soph, a bragging boy is he, 

With sleepy, watery eyes; 
And his monstrous jaws are opened wide to gulp down every prize. 

His book is shut, his mind is free, 

He brushes off the flies ; 
His length is stretched neath the poplar tree; 
He dreams of college cries, 
And thinks he hears the Fresh come forth to take him by surprise. 

Presumptuous Soph, his brains are small, 

A truly wondrous man ! 
A useless stick at playing ball, 
He cribs when'er he can, 
And shuns the whole world every day, for hi owes most every man. 

On Sunday morn he goes to church, 

His duty now is done: 
In slumber wrapt, in corner perched, 

Of the sermon he hears none, 
But dreams till the organ's pealing tones sound forth the waking gun. 

Sleeping, dreaming, playing, 
Through his college course he goes ; 

Each morning he returns to "flunking," 
Each even he doffs his clothes, — 
Nothing attempted, nothing done, he still seeks more repose. 



179 



An Experience Meeting. 

■ — — © — 

Scene, Y. M. C. A. Time, June, 1895. All the " Willie-boys" of '97 
assembled. Experience meeting. Opened by singing No. 165: 

" Simply t-Rusting every day." 

Chairman: — There will now be an opportunity for each to relate his 
experiences while in college, and to compare notes on oui mistakes and fail- 
ures. ' ' Benny, ' ' as you have not been as long in college as the rest, and 
have the reputation of being the only man in the class who dares row, you 
may speak. 

B. J. — " Well (he, he), I'd like to ask why none of you boned into our 
first row with '98. They beat the life out of me, but I couldn't row for the 
whole class; you all seem to be afraid of '98. That first row frightened you so 
thoroughly that you have kept out of any trouble with them ever since. 
Now, isn't this a nice record for our class, only one row that could be called 
so, no snow-ball row, no chapel rushes, no flour and salt row. I think our 
name will go down to posterity as a very peaceful class. Of course we 
couldn't expect '98 to start all the rows, and if there were no row r s we are the 
real ones to blame. 

Glass: — I thought it beneath me to row with '98, but to tell the truth, 
whenever w r e did have a row I was generally beneath one of their men; but 
when they posted a challenge on the bulletin board, I tore it down. I guess 
I'll read it, as some of you may not have heard it: 
"A Rusty lot of Rustics, 

These Hamilton Sophomores, 
They've been so long in College 
They're rusted o'er and o'er. 

" A Puny gang of cowards, 

They don't dare have a Row, 
But if they'll only start it 
'08 will show them how." 

Babcock (lippus-blear-eyed) : — I tried to stop the disturbances, because 
mamma doesn't like to have me fight with those rough fellows. In the row 
we had after we had stolen their canes, one of their men knocked me down, 
and I said: ' ' See here. I don't want to row, and neither do you, so let's stop. ' ' 
He let me up, but I don't see now why he laughed. I think the best way to 
show our class spirit is not to row, but to do just as we did when we sneaked 
in the back door of the Psi U. house, while all the '98 men were away, and 
stole their canes. 

Johnson (Tow-head): — Do yew fellers wont'er know what I think 'bout 
that cane business? I think it was a durty, low-lived trick, and I never felt 
more like kickin' somebody than I did when I heard those canes were stolen. 
(Amen from Ames.) 

Bogue (with a voice like a rusty hinge): — Do any of you know what 
became of that flag we put up on the flag-pole? We were taxed 18c. apiece 

180 



for it, and if any of yon haven't it I want my money back to buy a new hair 
curler. 



MacGregor: — '98 had more men than we did 



and 

but 



we couldn't row them; 
I guess we'll have to 



We can say this much for 
A. than anv other class, 



but I did awfully want to beat them at base ball, 
wait until Ave have children to beat. 

Ehman: — Brethren, let us have good heart. 
'97, that more of her men belong to the Y. M. ( 

and a good many sing in the choir. I don't like that awful song the '98 men 
sing about us, although we always let them sing it, because we can't help 
ourselves, I suppose. They sing it like this: 

Have you seen them, have you met them ? 

If so you'll ne'er forget them, 

These frightened little Sophomores; 

With their Rusty eyes of Brown, 

There are Williams and MacGregor, 

0. A. Johnson, Burke and Kessler, 

The biggest pack of cowards 

We have ever seen in town. 

But when the Freshmen 

Meet them on the Campus 

And tight as they have 

Never fought before, 

'98 will surely win, 

She can do it once again, 

For she's been there 

Several times before. 

Congdon: — I have looked up the derivation of our class motto, and think 
it ought to be changed to f»)<7Tt/.y>'>><, which means " treated badly ;" our Eng- 
lish cognate is ' ■ Rusty cuss. ' ' 

Chairman: — My dear fellow-classmen: We have this to be thankful for, 
that we are all well, and have happily survived the disasters of the year in 
which '98 came on the scene. 

Let us close with the class hymn — 

3 '' Rust as I am, without one flea." 

Class dismissed. 




181 




\ 

To qrtoLTtr 7* , /v o s cK c JJi r-o v fc 

<jT D r })t Vi ^tra-VAT^c/TttSAAO^t a-Ar<^ W4MJ $ To b £ 




// 



/V S)> 



o r T. t Y Joy l 1 



/.x: 




An Episode. 



HE night was cold and howling with wind and cutting rain, 
As I went across the campus to my studying domain ; 
My thoughts were dull and gloomy and my mind was far away, 
I had lost at poker the night before and had yet my bills to pay. 




UT hark ! what is that fearful sound that pierces through the night ? 
It sounds like a panther fierce and wild upon a luckness wight. 
I feel my blood with horror freeze, I fall down in the way ; 
A fool I found myself to be, — 'twas Miller's donkey bray. 



183 



RECORD OP 

Hamilton College 5^ List 

(BY PERMISSION OF THE EXCUSE COMMITTEE.) 



Name. Malady. Antidote. 

Burgess, .... Hydrophobia, Trip to Waterville. 

Wright, .... Inn amatory Rheumatism, . . Bohning. 

Greenwood, . . . Weak eyes, Glass ones. 

France, " That tired feeling,'' .... Hood's sarsaparilla. 

Owen, Insomnia, A geology trip. 

Seymour, .... Appendicitis, Less pie. 

Bacon, Ennui, Squires' lectures. 

Cookinham, . . . " Any old thing, " . . ^ . Walk with Houghtonites. 

Ward, Obesity, Exams. 

Wood, Love lorn, Engagements. 

Anderson, .... Yellow fever, Hopeless. 

Beardsley, . . . Stomach disorder, " Soft drinks. " 

P. Rose, .... Strained voice, Choir practice. 

F. Rose, .... Taking care Percy, . . . . Dodging the faculty. 

DeFrank, .... Manual labor, A swift shoot. 

Robbins, .... Essay fever, No excuse. 

Stevens, .... Chronic indisposition, .... Holiday. 

E. R. Wright, . . Cocoethes loquendi, .... Salt. 

Cunningham, . . Homesick, Ticket 0. & W. 



84 



"Ul^, 3. ft 



rLu^v- KaAj^<JiAAAnJi\j^ 




Congratulations 3eem to be in Order, 



Justice King is now deposed ; 

Hoiv "'twas done he does not know, 
College men claim not the honor ; 

But they're glad to see him go. 

As a citizen of Clinton 

He will pull our legs no more : 
Honesty at last has triumphed; 

And his office days are o'er. 

He 1 11 no longer pen those letters 

He so often used, to write : 
Please come down with ten cold dollars 

Prompt at eight o'clock to-night.' " 

Kindest friend, we're very sorry 
That your revenue is gone ; 

But our sorrow's of the kind 
1 hat we celebrate in song. 



R. S. P. V. 



185 



Reading R^gdd) Regulations. 



(1.) This reading room shall be kept open every day in the year, and shall 
be the general resort for conversation parties and Freshmen. 

(2.) Please to observe that there will be no fire in the furnace, except on 
warm summer evenings. 

(3.) All persons entering this room are requested to talk their loudest and 
to play the piano if they know how, or if they think they do. A 
brass band will be furnished next year if the taxes are paid. 

(4.) Please do not leave the room without some slight souvenir, such as 
' ' Life, " u Harper' s, " or " Century. ' ' If word be left with the cus- 
todian he will be happy to leave magazines at the rooms of those 
who are too lazy to "swipe" them themselves. When you steal clip- 
pings you are requested to throw the rest of the paper in the fire. 

(5.) After reading the papers leave them on the floor, unless that is already 
occupied; if so, hang them on the chandelier. 

(6. ) The lights are lighted from twelve to one on Monday nights. The cus- 
todian will see that the chimneys are cleaned once a year, and that 
the lamps leak regularly and profusely. 

(7.) Any one having any complaints to make will please go to — thunder. 

BY ORDER OF THE Y. M. C. A., 

viz., the men who appropriate the reading room at all hours of the 
day, and the papers when they leave. 



18(i 



PICTURE OF THE FRESHMAN PRIZE SPEAKERS. 



TAKEN BY B R A I N A R D , - - COLLEG E HILL. 



187 



©dotations. 



"OLD HAMILTON. 
THE FACULTY. 

" PREXY." 

"OLD GREEK." 
"SQUARE." 

"HOPS:" 

"SCHXITZIE:" 

"BILL NYE:" 

"BUGS:" 

"CLINTY:" 
"HARRY SMITH:" 

"SQUIRES:" 

"PILLS:" 
"B. G. : " 

DODGE: 



COUPEE: 



"Stern rugged nurse: Thy rigid lore 
With patience many a year we've bore." 

" I would some things were dead and hid, 
Well dead, and buried deep as Hell ; 

And recollection dead as well, 
And resurrection — God forbid." 

" To reign is worth ambition though in Hell. 
Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven." 

"That head of silver grey which all men know." 

" In mathematics he was greater 
Than Tycho Brahe, or Erra Pater," etc. 

" Speak, man, less recent, 
Fragmentary Fossil." 

"A stony adversary, an inhuman wretch, 
Incapable of pity, void and empty 
From any dram of/mercy. ' ' 

" Law's the wisdom of all ages, 
And managed by the ablest sages." 

"He waddled in and waddled out, 
And left the people all in doubt." 

"Look, then, into thine heart, and write." 

" O years, gone down into the past, 
What pleasant memories come to me." 

" In arguing, too, the parson owned his skill. 
For e'en though vanquished, he could argue stil 

" Constant as the northern star." 

"Awkward, embarrassed, stiff, without the skill 
Of moving gracefully, or standing still, 
One leg, as if suspicious of his brother, 
Desirous seems to run away from t'other." 

" I pity bashful men, who feel the pain 
Of fancied scorn, and undeserv'd disdain, 
And bear the marks upon a blushing face 
Of needless shame, and self-impos'd disgrace." 

"A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch." 



188 



'95 



SENIORS : " Where boasting ends, there dignity begins." 

AIKEN : " Men should be what they seem." 

BUELL : " Tarry at Jericho until your beard be grown." 

BURGESS : " And, when a lady's in the case, 

You know, all other things give place." 

CLARK : "I am not up to small deceit or any sinful games." 

DE LA FLEUR : " His tawny beard was the equal grace 
Both of his wisdom and face." 

DUDLEY : "I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth." 

FERRY : "He trudged along unknowing what he sought ; 

And whistled as he went for want of thought." 

FRANCE : " What harm if men who burn the midnight oil, 

Seek once a week their spirits to assoil." 

GREENWOOD : " What's a fine person, or a beauteous face, 

Unless deportment gives them decent grace ?' ' 

LOOMIS : " His voice no touch of harmony admits, 

Irregularly deep, and shrill by fits." 

MAC CONNELL : " If music be the food of love, play on." 

" FREAK No. 2 : " Stretched forth his little arms and smiled." 

OW T EN : "Sleep on, thou pretty, pretty Lamb." 

SULLIVAN : "As for his appearance, it beggars all description." 

THORP : " Up from the meadows rich with corn." 

WRIGHT : " Now half appeared the tawny lion." 



'96. 

JUNIORS: "Noble by birth, yet nobler by deeds." 

BABTIST: " By outward show let's not be cheated; 

An ass should like an ass be treated." 

COMMERFORD: " The heavens rain odors on you! " 

COOKINHAM: " His nature is too noble for the world." 

KNOWLTON: " But if a man be shy— a man- 

Why, then the worse for him." 

LAIRD : ' ' Every Saturday night in May. ' ' 

RICE: "Universal plodding prisons up 

The nimble spirits in the arteries. ' ' 



189 



ROBBINS: 

SCOVEL: 
TOWNER: 

VAX WIE: 
WARNER: 

WARD: 
AVAR FIELD: 

WOOD: 



SOPHOMORES: 
BABCOCK: 
BOGLE: 
DAVY: 

FETTERLY: 
GEORGE: 

c. a. johnson 
McGregor : 

SWEET: 
TURNBULL: 

WILLIAMS: 
ROSES: 

BURKE: 



" What croaker is this same, that deafs our ears 
With this abundance of superfluous breath ? " 

"The empty vessel makes the greatest sound." 

" And I a waif of stormy seas, 
A child among such men as these!." 

"How Van wants grace, who never wanted wit." 
' ' Why that worn and anxious face ? 
He grinds and grinds to keep his place." 

" Why, what's the rush? you'll reach there soon enough. 

" Although he is a little lad 
He chins and chins to beat the bad." 

" A poet; a poet forsooth! fool, hungry fool." 



'n 



" Foul cankering rust the hidden treasure frets." 

" With open mouth, swallowing his tears anew." 

" What dreadful noise of waters in my ears." 

"Drudgery and knowledge are of a kin, 
And both descended from our parent sin." 

" Put him in clothes and he% a perfect miss." 

" And when Rome falls — the world." 

" I read books good and bad." 

" I do but sing because I must." 

"Hey day, what a sweep of vanity comes this way. 

' ' You ornery 

Duined old 

Long legged Jim." 

" Conceit in weakest bodies strongest works." 

"The tenor's voice is spoilt by affectation; 
And for the bass, the beast can only bellow." 

" Did nothing in particular, and did it very well." 



'?*■ 



THE FRESHMAN : "He was as fresh as in the month of May." 
f >k FRANK : "Wisdom in sable-garb arrayed." 

DEWEY : "A little curly-headed, good-for-nothingr 

And mischief-making monkey from his birth." 
ELMORE : " He'll never come back any more." 



190 



HOLMES : ' ' Does that over nice 

And formal clothing, prove a scorn of vice." 

KIMBALL : "There is a method in man's wickedness." 

MINOR : "Clap, freshy, clap thy hands." 

McINTIRE : ' ' Hurray ! Hurray ! ' ' 

NOBLE : "Thou dull important lump of pride." 

PIERCY : (The editors have failed to find a quotation applicable. ) 

REED : " Behold the child, by nature's kindly law, 

Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw." 

ROBBINS : ' ' Coward of heroic size. ' ' 

STEVENS : " He was studious — of his ease." 

WADE : " Heaven bless thee ! 

Thou hast the sweetest face I ever looked on." 

WHITE : " Linked sweetness long drawn out." 

CARVER : "To get thine ends, lay bashfulness aside." 

KELSEY : " God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man." 

WELLS : "A life that leads melodious davs." 



T^ceUaneoas. 



EXAMS. : "I say the woeful fatal day is come.' 

COLLEGE CHURCH : 

' ' * prove their doctrine orthodox, 
By apostolic blows and knocks." 

" ' He was a brick,' let this be said." 



BLAKE: 

ROGERS, 

WELLS, 

WRIGHT, 



" One day I missed them on the accustomed hill. 



HOUGHTONITES: "They flirt, they sing, they laugh, they tattle." 

VACATION: " There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming. ' ' 

GESSELLSCHAFT: " I likes my lager, 'tis very good peer." 

CLINTON " 400 : " " Society is now one polished horde, 

Formed of two mighty tribes, the Bores and Bored." 

KELSEY, 
WRIGHT, 
EARLE, 

JUNIOR PROM. COMMITTEE : 

"What is't to us if taxes rise or fall? 
Thanks to our fortune, we pay none at all.' 



" Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres." 



191 




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ward grace of equal fellowship 
which has ever been claimed an 
an inner fact in the republic of learning. 

The gown uniforms a body of scholars, overcoming the non- 
descript dress of any considerable number of m~n or women. 
On the score of economy it saves many h young man or woman 
considerable expenditure at the end of a course, when there is the 
least left to spend, but when it is desirable to make the best ap- 
pearance. In schools and colleges where gowns are worn through- 
out the year the plainest suits or di esses may be worn beneath 
them. Gardner Cotrell Leonard, B.A., 

in University Magazine. 

Cotrell & Leonard, 

472 AND 174 BROADWAY, ALBANY, N. Y., 

Makers of CAPS AND GOWNS 

To the American Schools, Colleges and 
Universities. 



Illustrated Treatise. Etc., Fret- upon Application. 



KEJMT& MIl^ER 

JVlANUFAeTUREF^S Of 




L©TMH 



FOR MEN, BOYS AND CHILDREN. 
Beautiful Black Clay Suits, 

For Men and Young Hen, $14, $16 and $18. 

Handsome Dress Coats and Vests, 

For Men and Young Hen, $18. 

MAGNIFICENT STOCK OF CLOTHING FOR 

■a-BOYS AND ejHIbDREISH* 

130-134 So uth Salina St reet, SYRACUSE , ft Y, 

Government Square Cafe, i , 5 jftKHI & KbMESAB? ; *. v. 

CHAS. W. KELLEY I 



THOMAS BOWEN. 
> 

< 

UJ 

□_ 
co 



ELEGANT PARLORS CONNECTED 



Q 
(3 

UJ 

X 




5=5 



MPERIAL PUNCH. 

XII, 



Huburn Ubeoloojcal Seminary 

New Chairs of Infraction. 

HAMILTON STUDENTS ALWAYS WELCOME. TERM BEGINS SEPTEMBER 18, 1895. 

HENRY |E. BOOTH, President, 

AUBURN, N. Y. 

7^ good THi^g — pUsH iT^Li HG. M 

Hamiltonians embrace the opportunity ( when you have nothing better ) and 
call on us when you wish to return to old Hamilton. Be it any time of day or 
night, we will send you in fine style, and at prices to suit the times. 

Truly yours, 

POOLER <& BOGERT, 

LIVERY, 12 MKIN ST., 

—••TELEPHONE No. 167*S@> Opposite Bajjlf 'S Motel, UTICA, IS. V. 

WALLACE B. WILCOX, 



^ 



^WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

JEWELRY, 

SILVERWARE, 



WEDDING, RECEPTION AND VISITING CARDS, AND DEALER IN 
.o~^2)FINE STATION ERY.<s=^-c. 

30 GENESEE STRE6T, - - UT1CH, N. V. 



THE PISK TEACHERS' AOEIVCIES. 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, WASHINGTON, CHICAGO, TORONTO, MINNEAPOLIS, OLYMl'IA AND LOS ANGESES. 



EVERETT O. FISK & CO., Proprietors. 



President, EVERETT 0. FISK, 
4 Ashburton place, Boston, Mass. Connected by telephone. Cable address, Fiskburt, Boston. 

MANAGERS. 



W B. Herrick, 4 Ashburton place, Boston. Mass.; A. G. Fisher. 4 Ashburton place. Boston, Mass.: 
Martha Hoag 4 Ashburton place, Boston, Mass.; Helen G. Eager, 4 Ashburton place, Boston, Mass.: H. E. 
Crocker, 70 Fifth avenue, New York, N. Y.; W. D. Kerr, 70 Fifth avenue, New York. N. Y.: P. V. Fluys- 
soon, 70 Fifth avenue. New York, N. Y.; W. 0. Pratt, 70 Fifth avenue, New York. N. Y : Mrs. S. Pabney 
Thurmond, 803 12th street, Washington, D. C: B. F. Clark. 355 Wabash avenue. Chicago, 111.: W . O. McTag- 
gart 82 Church street. Toronto, Can.: J. D. Engle, Century Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn.: Mrs. E. Dowhng En- 
gle, Century Bldg.. Minneapolis, Minn.: B. W. Britnall, Olympia, Washington: C. C. Boynton, l'-MC. S. 
Tpring street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

XIII. 



Res Gestae. 



Sept. 19. " Once more beneath the poplars." Prexy's tally-ho ride. "Nit." 

Sept. 20. College opens. Fresh, and Sophs, try their muscle. " B. G." gives the 

Freshmen their names. 
Sept. 22. Baseball row. One Fresh, gets a free bath. "Doc" Frost smiles again. 
Earle starts in to run the College. Stevens gives Sophs, lessons in danc- 
ing and oratory. Protection declared off. 
Sunday. Stryker's insomnia cure opens again. 

Freshman goes to the Morrill mansion and asks for Mrs. "Bugs." Prex. 
consults an attorney and advises the Freshmen to carry bowie knives and 
pistols. 
Warfield goes to sleep in Hop's Sunday school class (which meets on Mon- 
day). Note book swiped. Frantic effort to regain the same. 
Freshman inquires for Prex. 's room in South College. " B. G." announces 
that shaking up in chapel must cease. Fresh, want another row; Sophs, 
have a previous engagement. 
" B. G." tries to keep order in chapel. 
Field Day. '97 wins. 
" Hub." goes to church. 
Bobby Kelsey's barbecue. 
Smith cuts debate. 

Dodge sick. Freshmen play town muckers foot ball. 
" B. G." still trying. Charles Dudley Warner lectures. 
Blue and Buff adopted. 
Freshmen do the raid act Sunday evening. 
Finn looks between the bars. 
Scats disappear from chapel. 

Prex. irate. Earle abdicates and Stryker resumes control. Bill Nye instructs 
the Juniors how to vote. Prohibition ticket not mentioned. 
Nov. 6. Election Day. "Chick" Ward disgraces Bill's lecture and votes the pro- 
hibition ticket. Bates votes for Belva. 
Democrats look seedy. Hewitt and Pete Kelley seek consolation. 
St. Clair Mclvelway. 

St. Clair again. Hamiltonian Board organized. 
" B. G." makes a violent effort. 
Meeting of the Trustees. 

( Continued on page XXVIII.) 



Sept. 


23. 


Sept. 


24. 


Oct. 


1. 


Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


14. 


Oct. 


15. 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. : 


20-30. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


28. 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


5. 



Nov. 


i . 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 


13. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


20. 



c?m 







Are more uniformly excellent than any oth- 
ers, and are constantly advancing, artistic- 
ally and practically 



His lew Matt Fill: 



PHOTOGRAPHS in fine Engraving Tone, 
incite the greatest admiration of the artistic. 

CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER to Hamilton College. 

studio, rome, n. y. 
Williams & Morgan, 




^Ithe leaders inC^ 
^"^all grades of o^ 



Furniture, 

OFFER SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS TO THE 
NEW STUDENTS OF HAMILTON COL- 
LEGE TO CALL AND PURCHASE 
THEIR FURNITURE OF THE LEADERS 
OF GOOD GOODS AT RIGHT PRICES. 



31 GENESEE STREET, UTICA, N. Y. 




RICHARD B. LOCKWOOD, 

(of the late firm of Geo. R. Loekwood & Son.,) 

College Fraternity and Class Engraver, 

203 BROADWAY, ROOM 510, NEW YORK. 



MY SPECIALTIES. 

Fraternity and class Engraving, Pictorial and Heraldic Steel Plates, Illustrations for College Annuals 
Diplomas. Certificates of Membership, Class and Fraternity Crests, Coats-of-Arms, Monograms, Address and 
Lodge Headings, Book Plates, Seals, Devices, Fine Writing Papers, Calling Cards, Stamping, Embossing and 
Illuminating. 

ART EjNGR/WING IN BANK JMOTE STYbE. 



CLINTON, N. Y. 

H (Soob IRome, with Uborouob Culture. 

Preparatory and Collegiate Courses for Young Ladies. 



REV. C. W. HAW LEY. 



Principal. 




JOS. WINB'fiURGII & SONS, 



DEALERS IN 



i 



Orders Taken for Society Pins. 
32 Genesee St., T JTICA, N. Y. 



01 



^J 



ID 

In 



Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Enlarged by addition of fifty rooms since the Season of 1894. Pirst= class family 
Hotel. Open from May 11th to Nov. 1st. Send for Illustrated Pamphlet. 



3E~— o<^o» 



W. B. HUESTIS, 



Proprietor. 



SOCIETY PAPER, CARDS, INVITATIONS, ANNOUNCEMENTS, }VIENU CARDS 



KND PROGRKMMES, 



Fraternity Rings, 

Lockets, Fobs, 
Garters, Belts, 

and Everything 
in Gold and Silver 




CLASS CANES, 

FRATERNITY PIPES 

AND CANES. 



Tflne ©o Mo ©LHP 




® If you want to seenew Shoes, novel Shoes, odd Styles, 

COME TO OUR SHOE STORE. 
If you want the best Shoes made, at the lowest possible price, 

COME TO OUR SHOE STORE. 
If you want a good Shoe for anybody, or for any purpose, 

COME TO OUR SHOE STORE. 



388 Main Street, 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 



151 Genesee Street, 

UTICA, N. Y. 



yij olds' Music fioonf; 



^^^^g- 



PIANOS AND ORGANS, 

Small Instruments anfc flDustcal flDercbanfcise* 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. TUNING AND REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. SHEET MUSIC AND MUSIC 

27,2 Genesee, and in Washington Sts., UTICA, N. Y. 



\u. 



5 Pltotograpis aimd 



CABINET PHOTO t GARDNER 6c FREY, 

$3.00 PER DOZ. # No. ii Broad St., Utica, N. Y. 

Williams & Jones, 

Mereltaaiimtl Tainflcors, 

4 FAYETTE STREET, UTICA, N. Y. 

Our Stock is composed of the finest of both Foreign and Domestic 
Goods, which we make up in the best possible manner, at reasona- 
ble prices. 

A call will Convince You. 

ROWLEY & HORTON, 

UTICA, N. Y. 

Tfine LeadnnKni SHattndDimeirs 



OF- THE CITY. 



Blank Books, fine Stationery, Artists' Materials, Architects' Goods, fine 
Wallets and Leather Novelties. Everything in the line at reasonable prices. 



STUDENTS.' 



ffl«"* ffl. ffl 



ELLS 



IS 7SOENT FOR 



LEAHY'S LAUNDRY, 

That has supplied Hamilton's students with spotless linen for the past six- 
teen years. 

QUALITY OF MORK KLMHYS THE BEST. 

H. D. HOLBROOK & CO. 



Hie 




■$HS- 



77i/3» LATE ^ T STYLES. 
I MIC best MAKES. 



Special attention paid to Sporting and 
Athletic Shoes. 

H. D. HOLBROOK <St CO., 156 Genesee St., UTICA, N. V. 



SHAUGHNESSY BROS., 

143 GENESEE STREET, ARCADE. 

-»■ :=$ & £=; ■»- 

HOES, FORKS, RAKES, SHOVELS, 

SCALES, OIL RANGES, REFRIGERATORS, 

RUBBER HOSE, BUILDERS' HARDWARE, WHEELBARROWS, 

CLOTHES WRINGERS, AXES AND HATCHETTS, 

IMPERIAL BICYCLES. 

SHHUGHNGSSY BROS. 



XIX. 



I JU5T THE THING 1 

| FOR STUDENTS \ 

3 9 

1 



mmm 




3 
3 

3 
3 

nnt- a j ¥ \] r^\T JI}}) ARE THE BEST AND M0ST economi- i 

1 llG L^l li lZIi C cal collars and CUFFS WORN. 3 

rhey look like linen, and are the only goods that a well-dressed gen- A 

tleman can wear in place of r< al linen. 3 

They are not to be washed; all laundry trouble and expense are (7 

avoided. J 

Tlie price of a single "Lixexe" Collar is 2\ cts. When once worn, j£ 

then turned (or reversed), it becomes a fresh, new collar. Tims the i 

actual price of one " Lixexe " Collar is reduced to 1 \ ets. 3 

, When Soiled on Both Sides, Throw Away and Take a New One. i 

I ASK THE DEALERS FOR THEM. £ 

Sold for Twenty-five cents for a Box of ten Collars, or five Pairs of Cuffs, v 
3 3 

A IF NOT FOUND, WE WILL SEND BY MAIL AT SAME PRICE A 

? FOR TRIAL. ® 

7 9 

\ \ Sample Collar and a Pair of Caffs Sent by; nail for $ix Cents. 3 

3 Address, giving size and style wanted, 3 

3 F^EVERSIBbE SOLbAR 60, I 

\ BOSTON, JV1ASS. I 



H. R. DOWER, 

COLLEGE JEWELER. 

Fraternity and College Badges and Charms a Specialty. 

Room I, Myers' Block, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



enndlememi I 



Mben in want of firetxrlaee work 
Tin framing, or some nice pictures, 



CALL 



AT McKOWN'S, 



No. 8 Whitesboro St., UTICA, N. Y. 

ECHTER & DEHS, 

Salon and Restaurant, 

CORNER JOHN AND MAIN STREETS, 
Open Day and Night UTICA, N. Y. 

W©M©EK M©TEL 

Saratoga Springe, N. Y. 

<§pen all tbe l£ear. Steam 1beat. Elevator. 

W. W. WORDEN, PROP'R. 



f—ACTS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. The School Bulletin 
I Teachers' Agency has secured for Hamilton Graduates, 55 positions to 

teach, at Salaries amounting to more than $50,000. Here are the names: 



C. W. Allen. 


J. B. Fitch, 


J. E. Massee, 


E. M. Armstrong, 


F. C. Goulding, 


J. Milton, 


S. D. Arms, (3) 


J. B. Hastings, 


G. H. Ottoway, 


H. A. Balcom, (2) 


A. M. Hollister, (2) 


J. G. Peck, 


W. H. Benedict, 


E. L. HoCKRIDCE, (3) 


R. B. Perrine, 


H. H. Bice, (2) 


R. J. Hughes, 


E. C. Sherman, 


F. H. Brooks, 


L. R. Hunt, 


H. E. Shumway, ( 


H. A. Brown, 


E. Johnson, 


J. V. Sturges, 


S. R. Brown, 


F. C. Kane, 


F. S. TlSDALE, 


H. W. Callahan, 


W. C. Reuse, 


F. B. Waite, 


W. G. Carmer, (3) 


H. H. Loomis, 


W. L. Weeden, (2) 


F. L. Dewey, 


C. L. Luther, 


E. R. Whitney, 


G. W. Ellis, 


F. B. McLean, 


J. Winne. (2) 


H. A. Evans, (2) 


R. B. Marvin, 




C. 


W. BARDEEN, 


Send for Circulars. 




SYRA< 



tutterfi 



ow@r Dtoe. 



ALL KINDS OF FLOWERS IN SEASON, 
FRESH EVERY DAY. — 



WM. MATHEWS, Propr. 



Nurseries 11 to 19 York Street, 



UTICA, N. Y. 



John S. Davies, 

'Successor to DAVIES & WILLIAMS,) 

Castoro Tailor, 

-BAGG'S HOTEL, 



Special prices to Students. 



UTICA, N. Y. 



— ©— 

WHEN YOU HAVE BEEN TO UTICA, IN ALL PROBABILITY YOU HAVE 

VISITED THE 

parlor Sboe Store. 

/[F YOU HAVEN'T, you are invited to call and inspect our beautiful 
N stock of Shoes, bought expressly for the Spring and Summer trade. 
Our large trade enables us to keep constantly changing our stock, so we do 
not accumulate any old styles. We carry everything of the very best, never 
forgetting to charge you a fair profit, and always remembering to give you 
the best goods to be found in the American markets. 

Parlor Shoe Store, 

185 Genesee Street, UTICA, N. Y. 

J. ft. & el. M. TimNBULL, 
(ieneral ® In^arance ® Acrenfe, 

Mather's Bank Building, Cor. Genesee and Bleecker Sts., UTICA, N. Y. 

^ — 

SUN FIRE OFFICE of London, England. ROCHESTER GERMAN INS. CO. of Rochester, N. Y. 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL of Edinburgh, Scotland. FIREMEN'S INS. CO. of Newark, N. J. 

AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. Of New York. PROVIDENCE- WASHINGTON INS. CO. of Providence, R. I. 

AGRICULTURAL INS. CO. of Watertown, N. Y. MERCHANTS' INS. CO. of Providence, R. I. 




anqes 



© [sjotel. 



SMITH & WHITE, - - Proprietors. 

© ■ 

UTICH, NEM YORK, 



For fine 



PQnaDtogiraipIh] 



Go to 



A. E. WATERS & CO., 



39O0 



10 a o 



Cabinets, $2.$0 and #4.00 per dozen. 

Water Colors, Crayons and Copying, a specialty. 



■ALSO A FINE LINE OF- 



PICTURE f FRAMES, MOUbDINQS, Etc. 



SUCCESSORS TO 



O. H. SCOFI9LD, 



ESTHBLISHED 1S50. 



Optical, 
Mathematical, 

and 
Meteorological 

Instruments. 




Stereopticons, 

Magic Lanterns, 

Plain and Colored 

Lantern Slides, 

Etc. 



B. KOHN & SON, 

NO. 32 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 

APPARATUS FOR PROJECTION, 
A specialty. We publish four illustrated Catalogues covering above lines. 

Send for them. 



XXIV. 



THE HORACE PARTRIDGE CO., 

335 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

<^ 

Official Outfitters to the Hamilton College Base Ball Association, Season of 1895. 
MR. I. H. BUELL is our authorized agent at Hamilton. Any orders given him will have our 
prompt and careful attention 

&&> RERGRN * L0C %^. 

^•A N D M;E R C H A NT T AJ L D R S , -£§*- 

Ho. 72 Genesee Street, UTICfl, N- Y. 



CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS 

KINGSLEY'S J andHA TS 

41 TEN * PER •• GENT.K- 



CASH STORE, 

f 



& SOLD AT TEN PER CENT. PROFIT. 



110 Genesee Street, Prices marked ,n plain f.oures. 



UTICA, N. Y. 4* Absolutely no second price. 

TEEMS STEICTLY CASH. 



UDELMER C. ADAMS, ^ZT*aZw. 

128 SOUTfH SjfcblJNA STREET, *~ 

Syracuse, JN. Y. ™ 

MATTER AND FURRIER. 

^ /Manufacturer of Seaisftin ant> 

^ otber IRtcb jf ur Garments* 

SOLE AGENT FOR DUNLKP'S CELEBRATED N6W VORK HATS. 



AAZHerc IN UTICHi — » 

DON'T FAIL TO CALL ON 



FHTT 





OQ 



51 Pran^Un 3<saare. 



THEY are positively the leaders in this part of the country in fine foot- 
wear. No other dealers in Utica have the facilities for handling the 
stock or carrying the assortment. All sizes, styles, and the latest designs 
constantly in stock. We carry all the celebrated makes produced by the 
best shoe designers in the United States. Prices are alwa}^s consistent with 
Irish grade goods. 



POTTEM. 



00 



51 FRANKLIN SQUARE. 



IT 



flDanufacfuring Jewelers 

AND DEALERS IN 

•)IIBICYCLeS,r^ 
No. 10 Whitesboro St., UTICA, N. Y. 



BADGES. PRIZE MEDALS, 52CIETY FINS, 
Class Rings, Fraternity Badges, Sc, 

ttADE T° ORDER. 

THE FINEST REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 

AGENTS FOR THE 

ORIENT, CLEVELAND, UNION, AND CENTRAL 

BICYCLES. 



TROY HOUSE, 

The leading and only first=class House in the City. Electric Lights, Ele- 
vator, Steam Heat, &c. Table unsurpassed. 
Free 'Bus to and from Trains. 



B. F. STILES, Prop'r. 



'p 301,01*101? <jRIFFITM3, 

@* Aerdjant Tailor. 

CHOICE LINE OF ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND AMERICAN WOOLENS. 
STYLE, FIT AND QUALITY GUARANTEED. 

64 Genesee Street, UTICA, N. Y. 

GOODFELLOWS SON, 

DEALER IN 



E, LHfllPS, STOVES, TINWARE, 



Lead and Sheet Iron Pipe and Fittings. 
All Kinds of House Furnishing Goods. 

Winning, plumbing, Steam anfc (Baa fitting, 

STOVE AND FURNACE REPAIRING. 

THE BEST PAPER OF THE WEEK. 



XHttca Sunba^ tribune, 

— © — 

Only Paper Published on Sunday between Syracuse and Albany receiving the 
Telegraphic Service of an Associated Press. All the Sporting Events. 

FOR SALE ON THE CflPIPOS EVERY SONDRY [HORNING. 



SB 



7^GG7^GE 



QpR£5S 




WE ALWAYS TRY TO ACCOMMODATE THE BOYS, 
AND ARE ALWAYS ON TIME.^ 



(0ESLEU • W. • WEBL5, 



DEADER IN- 



2& ?len^ Pine 

Parntsf)incr Goods. 



Tlffi LATENT NOVniyTin^ 
IN N^C^WE^R —. 



MAT3, CAP3, 

Collar^ and CWP3 (B. er W.) 



^•€ 



g* ^td Gloves. 

FINE DRC33 5MIRT5 



$ccirf Pins, $>1zzvz gtttfons, $birt 3 tocI S» 
31II5 and I^inen Handkerchiefs, 

3il^ and Lyisle Thread Hosiers, 
Underuear, 

3it^ nnd gipciea Umbrellas, 

Canes, 3 atcI )els, Etc. 



MiteP>loc^, - Clinton, ft. <l. 



Nov. 


21. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


8. 


Dec. 


9. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


14. 


Dec. 


15. 


Dec. 


19. 


Jan. 


1. 


Jan. 


3. 


Jan. 


4. 


Jan. 


9. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


13. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


5. 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


7. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


9. 


Feb. 


10. 


Feb. 


20. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


23. 


Feb. 


28. 


March 1. 


March 3. 


March 13. 


March 15. 


March 16. 



Chancellor Upson lectures. 

Junior '< Prom." — Committee look sad. 

Large attendance at chapel. " Pete" collects forty-four bottles and one keg. 

Contents lacking. 
Thanksgiving Day. 

Glee and Banjo clubs give an entertainment in Clinton. 
" Schnitz " back. "Square" preaches. 
Math. Prize exam. " Square" in bliss — competitors not. 
Exams. — yellow-bottles— Profanity. 
Zelotus flunks "Old Greek." 
Vacation — yellow bottles — Bliss. 
9 a. m. France "swears off." 9 p. m. France "swears on." " P>. G." 

resolves to keep order in chapel. 
Winter term opens. Posters. 
Seniors hand in their Winter " Cribbs." 
Mose Grey rights in South. 

Colder than H . Zelotus' facial expression congeals. 

Sunday. " Square " preaches again. 

The new banners displayed in chapel. 

Zelotus thaws out and makes a terrible stab for Prize-speaking. " B. G." 

makes an enormous effort. 
Prex. indisposed. 

" Bill Nye " did not answer for Prex.'s proxy. 
" Old Greek" holds chapel. Signs of anarchy appear. 
"B. G." goes to N. Y. 

The Young Ladies of Clinton entertain. " Bill Nye" starts for N. Y. via Rom. 
"Old Greek" cuts. 
Blizzard strikes the Hill. 
Faculty snow bound. 
No Sunday chapel. 
Sophomore Hop. 
Washington's Birthday. 

" B. G." speaks to a few Freshmen in private. 
Glee and Banjo concert makes a trip though Central New York. 
" Hops " and Forest Rose sing a duet. 

" Homely" thinks an insult has been offered to his orthography. 
LTpper classmen cry snow-ball row. Sophomores in a hurry for dinner. 
" Sully" sleeps in the math. room. " Square " orders a disinfectant. 
College meeting. Decided to withdraw from the Inter-collegiate Athletic 

Association. 

(Continued on page XXXVI.) 



THE STUDENT! 



WILL FIND A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 




FINE SHOES, 
OXfORID TIES, 
and RUBBER GOODS, 

INCLUDING TENNIS GOODS, 

at J. M. browns, 

Mills Block, Clinton, N. Y. 

g^rRepairing and Fine Custom Work Neatly and Promptly Done.^^g 




Summer— WHITE DUCK PUTTS. 

We furnish them and will fit you at very 
close prices. 

We are also special agents for A. G. 
Spaulding & Bros., Wright & Ditson, and Peck & 
Snyder on Tennis, Base Ball, Foot Ball, Golf, Cro= 






^wilwIS we *> Canoeing and yachting good 

l HB.IN AUTUMN- 




FOOT BALL PANTS, GUARDS, PES, CAPS, B0LLS. 



J24 Souf/i Sa//jia Sf., 

Room Decorations, Artistic 
Screens, Panels, Roman 
Swords, Hooks, Racks, etc. 

WOOD'S * WOOD'S 




SHERMAN & CO.* 



HEN'S OUTFITTERS 



J. A. Bannister Co., Fine Shoes. 
Boston Rubber Shoe Co.'s Overshoes. 
Dr. Jaros' Hygienic Underwear. 
The Concave Yoke Shirt. 



$2 Genesee Street, 

UTICA, N. Y. 



Myron A. Gibbs B Son, 

^•Successors to A. F. MILLER.^ 



P>gdK Binders, 



Myron a. Gibbs, 
william h. gibbs 



)K MANUFACTURERS, 

©^^©Cor. John and Broad Streets,©^^©^^ 

UTICA, N. Y. 



L¥M@H 



LLY 



PRACTICAL 3MIRT i«\AISCR34^ 

-4»<JN-D AFN'3 FURNI^rlFRa, 



lOG GENESEE STREET, 



UTICA, N. Y. 



THE 



BaPa^efte Cafe, 



JOHN P. MURPHY. 



6 AND 8 FAYETTE ST., 

UTICfl, fl. V. 



Bicycles a^6 Hardware.. 

WE ARE SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED 

bms b [TAb.eON AND 

h old B ra i^ ALoC o^Ess BieveLES. 

Also the GENEVA and OHIO Bicycles. Excellent in quality, but lower priced than 

the Falcon. In Hardware, we have everything. A hundred thousand 

articles to choose from. Bells, Lamps, Pumps, Wrenches, 

and all extras for Bicycles. 

WRIGHT, DANA & CO., 

92 GENESEE STREET, UTICK, N. V. 



STUDENTS DO WELL TO PATRONIZE 

PHILIP KING, 

wbetc 



o 
Rooms over Robinson & Libbey's Livery Office. 

COLLEGE STREET, CLINTON, N. Y. 

WIR TH HO USE. 

(Formerly WILLARD HOUSE.) 

This Hotel has been thoroughly repaired and refitted. 

Now in first-class condition for the entertainment of the traveling 

public. 
Incites reasonable. 

K. WIRTH & SON, 

Proprietors. 



nmKnwnwmn 






HL, 



6. JH. SJVIYTJH, Age^t, 

Keeps Constantly on Hand the Different Sizes of 

M& ^be Celebrateb 
*9" Xacfcawanna Coal 

TftE DEMWAflE & flUDSOfl CAflRIt COMPANY. 



^ALL KINDS OF COAL^ 



Sold at the Lowest Market Rates. 



Coal to be paid for when ordered at their yard on 



COLLEGE STREET 

CLINK 



XXXIII. 



olleqe,fe<** 



Tf)e Faculty/, 3tadents and Friends- Aav; tfjeq live 
loner and bay all their Mardvare, Crockery, 
I^amps, Cutlery and all l^tnds of Moase Furnish- 
ings, of 

•m J. 4LLEN & SONi^ 

The Best Goods in the Market. 

(Jlvays ^p to Date and Everything just as Repre- 
sented. 

H. J. ALLEN & SON, 

/, 3 and 5 College St., 
CLINTON, N. Y. 



FURNACE, 

STOVE 

AND 

RANGE REPAIRING 

A SPECIALTY. 



TINNERS. 

PLUMBERS, 

STEAM 

AND 

GAS FITTERS. 



GO AND SEE 



DODGE & SHYDEP. 

-#3 WHEN IN WANT 0Fe§^ 

WALL PAPERS, 
WINDOW SHADES, 
PAINTS, 
QLASS, 

AND Abb KINDS Of BRUSjHES. 

29=31 John Street, 

Telephone 6^. UTlCA, N. *I 







We fornisf) and serve everyt bincr in tl)e vaq of Pctrt^ Supplier. 
liJe a^e onla ti)e very; best material in all departments of oar ba^ine^, and 
guarantee ^atisfcietton. 

200 Genesee Street, UTICA, N. a. 

JATvfES CLHRK, 

DEALER IN 

2§{tOT©§„ TnEo aimdl nirccDim Ware Q 



'0 11 ililUQ 

ROOFING AND PLUMBING A SPECIALTY. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO STEAM, HOT ITER AND IT AIR HEATH. 

TERMS CASH. 
25 College Street, CLINTON, N. Y 

^For Young Ladies.-^ 

Clinton, N. Y. 

O 



FFEES Unsurpassed Advantages for Four Courses in Languages, Science, Music 
and Art. These courses are attractive to graduates of high schools, who desire to 
study one or two years and receive the diploma of Houghton. 

Beautiful Grounds, Pure, Healthful Influences, Refined Associations, a Fine Library, 
Large Rooms, heated with steam and lighted with gas, and a Good Table, are considered 
the reasonable demands of patrons. 
For Catalogue or Record, address, 

A. Q. BENEDICT, A. M. 



March 


i 20. 


March 


.21. 


March 


i 22. 


March 


25. 


March 


26. 


March 


27. 


April 


12. 


April 


20. 


April 


21. 


April 


23. 


April 


24. 


April 


25. 


April 


30. 


May 


o. 


May 


3. 


May 


6. 


May 


7. 


May 


8. 


May 


9. 


May 


10. 


May 


11. 


May 


16. 


May 


23. 


May 


25. 


May 


27. 


May 


29. 


May 


30. 


May 


31. 


.June 


1. 


Juno 


2. 


June 


4. 


June 


5. 


June 


(5. 


June 


7. 



Glee and Banjo clubs give an entertainment in Utica. Reception given by 
the Fort Schuyler Club. "Bab." announces his personal acquaintance 
with Tiberius. 
Chemical and Classical Prize exams. 
All try exams. 
Freshmen lose their canes. 
Only row of the year. 
Winter term closes. 
Spring term opens. First Freshman asks when the Hamiltoxian will be out. 

He has since left College. 
"Jags" commence to ascend the " Hill." An advance in the price of Hops. 
" Bill Nye" preaches. 
' ' Nigger Baby ' ' makes its appearance. 

Hotter than H . 

Night-shirt parade at Houghton. Where did Johnson get those bloomers? 

" B. G." seems to know a good deal about the whisky trust, 

Zelotus consults a Phrenologist. 

" Pills" shaves his beard. 

Fresh, play Colgate base-ball. Base-ball manager appears on the field. 

Faculty gives the College a holiday. 

College gives the Faculty a holiday. 

Prex. dons a piccadilly. 

Alison's solo. 

" Billy" claims the bath tub is a luxury. 

Field Day. Sophomores win the pennant. First regular meeting of the 

" Wein, Weib und Gesang." Hops advance another notch. 
'' Scoop" shaves his upper lip. 
E. L. S. have their Fraternity picture taken. 
Squires cuts in Bible. 

Junior set-up on Prize speakers and winners of the Math. Prize. 
Memorial Day. 
Senior exams, begin. 

" Dagos" serenade the " Hill." Big boom in water works. 
" Hops." preaches in the presence of Prex. Eleven minute prayer. 
Seniors march into chapel. " Schnitz" grouchy. Refuses to rise. Senior 

vacation begins. That hairy joke again, " So nice to come back and see 

the boys." 
Clark prize. Lee is the man. 

"Bill Nye" presents the athletic banner to Ninety-seven. 
Warfield nominates himself for Pres. of Tennis Association. Hamiltoxian 

goes to press. 



,\ A XVI. 



fiWI 



' i EfC 




Pregressife IPMogiijplta 



56 (ienesee ^>t., 



UTICA, N. q 



fine Boots and Shoes 



El 



*H »& Xow prices aftb jfirst*class Mori?. <9t V£ 



Watson Block, Clinton, N. Y. 



BICYCLE LIVERY HND REPAIR SHOP, 

TAe £es* in Central New York. 

Fine Enameling, Nickeling, Etc. 

COMPLETE LINE OF SUNDRIES. 

Agency for Erie Bicycles. 

->|fl. F. FERRISX- 

50 Columbia St., 

UTICA, N. Y. 



WILL LAST A LIFETIME! 

ONE OF OUR 

<*^.jfountain pens.^r* 

gukr7sntee mith ekoh ren. 
Double Feeder. 

Booklet Free.»$«> 

Rapid Pen Factory, 

Washington, D. C. 

RALPH B. MINOR, 

Local Representative. 



liases 5~ Co., Bankers. 



Transact a Genera! Banking Business. 

Sell American and Foreign Drafts, and Furnish Letters of Credit. 
Sell Ocean Passage Tickets. 

Execute orders for all kinds of Investment Securities. 

HENRY W. ROBERTS, 



— DEALER IN-i?®> 



Fine Groceries and Provisions 



Of EVERY DESCRIPTIOJM. 
Fruits and Vegetables in Season. 



Cigars and Tobacco of All Kinds. 



?Ao 



YflCI, 

P,GDT3, 5MOE3, ETC. 

F'0>;ALSO'-0:4 

Making and Repairing 

Neatly and promptly done at reasonable prices, at the old stand in the 

SCOLLARD BLOCK. 



o hj) 



o 



p 

B 



TON 



Keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of 

(Groceries, Frtrwlslois, 



DRV GOODS AND NOTIONS, 

*£l}esf I^rands of Flour, Choice Teas and Coffees. 6p% 

PURE SPICES. 

A full line of Canned Goods, Fish, Pork, Hams, Dried Beef, Lard, etc. Oranges, Lemons, Figs, all 
kinds of Fruit in season, Condiments, etc. Best Tobacco and Cigars. Goods delivered promptly free of 
charge. 

^=^ College Street, CLIfiTON, % Y. 






nV<I^ 



Fine Book Printing 

and 

Half=Tone Work. 



Fine Color 

and 

Commercial Work. 

H lust rated Catalogue 

and 

Pamphlet Work. 

We Are Hot Exeelled. 



.0 — - -g )rzS^xr\Eb 



Have You Seen 
Any of It? ^ 



The Printing we are doing is 
. first=class and gives satisfaction 
Gp? wflw to alL Tr y it f or yourself. We 
guarantee satisfaction. 



Fierstine & Elwood, 

12 and 14 Elizabeth Street, 

\^~~ UTICA, N. Y. 



ESTABLISHED 1550. 



Optical, 
Mathematical, 

and 

Meteorological 

Instruments. 




Stereopticons, 

Magic Lanterns 

Plain and Colored 

Lantern Slides, 



Etc. 



NO. 32 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 

APPARATUS FOR PROJECTION, 

A specialty. We publish four illustrated Catalogues covering above lines. 

Send for them. 



B. KAHN & SON, 



WITaimHWs Bird Stored 

<^H^> A fiie Uie ef ^ Painting s 9 Water Colors, 
^glfc Etchings, Photographs, Engravings, Pie- 
^//j^ tire Frames and MoiiMingSo 

^•••f RAJVIES JYIADE TO ORDER WHILE YOU MIT** 

TANTON'3, 

25 Columbia St., UTICA,N,Y. 

^HCarpeimier 9 

I'M 5 h'KA MM fHOfOGf afHffl Of CLTOfON, 

JVl/KESjOrLL STYLES OF PHOTOGRAPHS. 

j^5 jg$ IReouceo rates for IbamUton Gollecie, k*s *?S 
*9 j Ibougbton ano Gottacje Seminaries. j> * 

POST=OFFICE BLOCK, CLINTON, N. Y. 

C. R. CARPENTER. 



f , J. n oot Zc firo. 



^DRUGGISTS and GROCERS,*^ 

OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, CIiIJlTON. 

Choice Confectionery, Cigars, Tobacco, Etc. 

Isaac Dawes, ^> 

h^Boots m ShoesK- 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF FINE SHOES. 

Boots and Shoes of all styles. Also a first=class hand made boot at $4.00. Cus= 

torn work and Repairing a Specialty. 
Students, if you want a good bargain, call on 

ISAAC DAWES, Clinton, N. Y. 



*UOHN MARSHA 

•••• DEALER IN---- 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, FINE JEWELRY AND SILVER GOODS. 



or 



REPKIRING K SPECIHLTY. 

<2-4 



^-^ 



'•©LIJMTOJM, N. Y. 



T. HOGAN, 

DEALER IN 

f INE IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 

TOB/VCCOS AJSID SMOKERS' MjATERI/VLS. 

FlflE BtpH PIPES ft SPECIALTY. 

All our goods are purchased direct from manufacturers, so we are prepared to give our customers 
the benefit. If you want a real good cigar for a nickle, and upwards, come and see us. 
West Park Row and College Street, .... CI.INTON. 

Tie Seollflfflrf 

CLINTON, N. Y. 

For Rental, apply to Dr. Scollard. 
Bagg's Hotel, Coleman House, 

UTI6A N- Y. Broadway and 27th St., 

' JSIEW YORK. 

l\cliLiE Y bt UU|l|lbU|l5 BROOMS $1.00 AND UPWARDS. *$&> 

CAFE POPULAR PRICES. 

proprietors - o. |«. JOHNSON, 



^^©^>©©-<^©<^ 



Proprietor. 



U/qeqeOer uou \Dar\ 



A SINGLE OF^. DOUBLE f^lG, 

-x-_eAbb AT— ^ 

Robinson's College Afreet Divert, 

Where you will find the Best Morses, and 

Most Stylish Rigs, Macks, Phaetons, 

( ONLY THLLY-HO IN TOWN,) 
Dn Hand at All Hours, Day or Night. 

Terms reasonable. ^ (live as a call. 

MMSOil Ix IIBBEY, ProprletorSo 



EIGHTY-THIRD YEAR. 



HAMILTON COLLEGE 

Clinton, Oneida County, New York. 



ON THE NEW YORK, ONTARIO & WESTERN RAILWAY, NINE MILES FROM UTICA, AND 
TWO HUNDRED and SIXTY-SIXTY MILES DIRECT FROM NEW YORK CITY. 



Founded in 1793 as Hamilton Oneida Academy. Chartered as Hamilton College in i8i2. 

Classical and Latin Scientific Courses. 

Beautiful Location. High standards of instruction. Strong depart- 
ments in Physical Sciences. Unexcelled discipline in Rhetoric and Oratory. 
Elaborate prize system. 

For particulars, address 

President M. WOOLSEY STRYKER. 

XLTT. 



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All of the firms whose advertisements are found in the 
Hamiltoni an are good and reliable, and the students will find 
it to their advantage to patronize them. 






XL. 



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